Please Note

The Washington Post is providing this important information about the coronavirus for free. For more free coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, sign up for our daily Coronavirus Updates newsletter where all stories are free to read.

All states and U.S. territories have eased restrictions on businesses and social activity, trying to restart economies battered by the novel coronavirus pandemic and weeks of stay-at-home orders that affected some 315 million Americans.

Public health experts warn that this increased activity is likely to cause a surge of new infections. “There is a real risk that you will trigger an outbreak that you may not be able to control” by reopening too quickly, said infectious-disease expert Anthony S. Fauci in Senate testimony May 12, “leading to some suffering and death that could be avoided.”

Cases continue to rise in some of the states where governors have been most aggressive in opening public spaces and businesses that rely on close personal contact, such as salons and gyms. None have met the federal government’s core recommendation of a two-week decline in reported cases.

Almost all schools are closed for the academic year, and many Americans remain nervous about venturing out, with a death toll of more than 103,000 and widespread accounts of people still unable to get tested.

The Washington Post is tracking the extent of this reopening alongside the rate of new infections and will update this page frequently.

Alabama

  • Open now: Gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, restaurant and bar dine-in services, beaches and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 28, the governor issued a safer-at-home order beginning April 30. The order allowed many businesses to reopen, provided physical distancing and sanitation rules are followed. Beaches could reopen, but people must maintain six feet of distance, and gatherings of more than 10 people are not allowed. Restaurants and bars were still limited to takeout, curbside pickup or delivery under the order. Retail stores could reopen at 50 percent capacity.

On May 8, the governor amended the order to allow restaurants and bars to reopen with limited seating, along with gyms and fitness centers beginning May 11. She extended the order from May 15 to May 22. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops could also reopen provided they follow physical distancing guidelines.

On May 22 at 5 p.m., large entertainment venues, athletic activities, and school and child-care facilities were allowed to reopen with physical distancing guidelines and capacity limits. Entertainment venues include bowling alleys, arcades, casino, theaters and concert venues.

Alaska

  • Now open: Places of worship, bars, restaurant dine-in services, theaters, retail stores, gyms and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.

On April 22, the governor announced the state would begin reopening businesses April 24, while still mandating physical distancing.

On May 8, the state began the second phase of its reopening plan, which allowed most nonessential businesses to reopen with limited capacity, including retail stores, fitness centers and bars.

On May 19, the governor said he would reopen his state entirely by May 22, ahead of Memorial Day weekend. He said the state would be skipping from Phase 2 of its reopening and going straight to Phase 4, allowing bars, theaters and gyms to resume business without any kind of capacity restrictions. The largest city, Anchorage, and the capital city of Juneau continue to limit capacity.

Arizona

  • Now open: Elective surgeries, casinos, gyms, major league sports without fans, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs.

On April 22, the governor issued an order that elective surgeries could resume May 1.

On April 29, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while also allowing retail businesses to begin selling goods May 4, with certain restrictions. Cosmetologists and barbers began resuming appointment-based services May 8, while restaurants and coffee shops began resuming dine-in services May 11, with certain restrictions.

On May 13, gyms and pools were allowed to reopen.

The stay-at-home order expired May 15, and the governor issued an executive order with guidance for the next recovery phase.

Starting May 16, major league sports, including MLB, NBA, NHL and NFL, can resume without spectators.

Arkansas

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, restaurant dine-in services, bars, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Movie theaters, concert and sporting venues.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs.

On April 18, the governor announced an economic recovery task force and said he hoped to ease restrictions in the state beginning May 4. Barbershops, salons, spas and massage therapists are among the businesses that could reopen beginning May 6, with some restrictions. Restaurants could reopen for dine-in service at 33 percent capacity beginning May 11.

On May 18, indoor venues such as theaters, casinos, arenas, stadiums and auction houses could reopen on a limited basis. The capacity is limited to 50 people, and physical distancing must be maintained, along with other limitations.

On May 19, bars that are inside restaurants began reopening, while “freestanding” bars could open May 26, according to the governor.

On May 22, recreational pools reopened with additional guidelines.

There has been no statewide stay-in-place order.

California

  • Now open: Lower-risk businesses including bookstores, florists and clothing stores. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops in most of the state.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 4, the governor announced some “lower-risk workplaces with adaptations,” including bookstores, florists and clothing stores, would be allowed to reopen May 8, with some modifications such as curbside pickup.

On May 18, the governor said sports could return the “first week or so of June without spectators” but with “modifications and very prescriptive conditions.”

On May 26, the vast majority of the state’s 53 counties qualified to reopen barber shops and hair salons under a complex formula set out by health officials. But they will remain closed in six of the hardest-hit jurisdictions, including Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Colorado

  • Now open: Campgrounds at some state parks, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 20, the governor announced the state would shift from a stay-at-home order to a safer-at-home order. Some personal-care providers, such as medical and dental offices, were allowed to reopen April 27, as long as physical distancing is maintained. Retail stores began reopening May 1 and larger business offices May 4 at 50 percent capacity.

On May 12, campgrounds at some state parks were allowed to reopen.

On May 27, restaurants were allowed to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Summer camps were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

Connecticut

  • Now open: Restaurants for outdoor seating, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, offices, outdoor museums and zoos.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 30, the governor outlined a phased reopening plan beginning as soon as May 20. Under the plan, restaurants could reopen for outdoor seating, and nonessential retailers could reopen, along with hair and nail salons. Offices would be able to reopen, but workers would be encouraged to still work from home if possible. Outdoor zoos and museums could reopen, and outdoor recreation such as camping could resume.

On May 20, the state’s first phase of reopening allowed restaurants to offer outdoor seating, retail stores to let customers inside, outdoor museums and zoos to resume operations, and offices to allow employees to return. Hair salons and barber shops were also slated to start reopening May 20 until the governor pushed back the date to June 1.

Delaware

  • Now open: Gyms; retail businesses; personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons are by appointment only. Restaurants for dine-in services by reservation only. Beaches and community pools.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 5, the governor announced “interim steps” for small businesses to begin reopening May 8. Small-business retailers such as clothing stores, book and music stores, tobacco and vape stores, and sporting good stores may begin to offer curbside pickup. Jewelry stores may open by appointment only, and hair care services may be offered, but only to essential workers and with additional restrictions.

On May 22, beaches and community pools reopened, along with ice cream shops and trucks.

On June 1, the state entered phase one of its economic reopening. It allowed many businesses to reopen at 30 percent capacity, including personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons by appointment only, exercise facilities and malls. Restaurants could offer dine-in services by reservation only. Bars, sporting and entertainment venues remain closed.

District of Columbia

  • Now open: Restaurants for outdoor dining. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops by appointment. Retail businesses for curbside pickup.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, gyms, pools, theaters, concert and sporting venues.

On April 8, farmers markets and fish markets were required to close unless they received permission from the city government to reopen with new restrictions, and playing golf and tennis were also banned. Essential businesses such as grocery stores and banks must post signs outside instructing customers to wear a mask or face covering and stay six feet from one another. The order reversed the closure of apartment rooftops and courtyard spaces, provided that people visit these places only with family members and while keeping their distance from others. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six feet of physical distance.

On April 15, the mayor issued an order requiring people to wear masks or face coverings at hotels, during taxi and ride-share trips, and when selling food.

On May 13, the mayor extended the city’s stay-at-home order, mass gathering ban and closure of nonessential businesses through June 8, saying infections have not declined enough to start reopening the capital. Starting May 15, educational and academic retail shops, such as bookstores, could seek waivers to reopen for curbside and front-door pickup sales.

On May 29, the city entered phase one of reopening, which allows restaurants and taverns to resume outdoor dining, barber shops and salons can open by appointment with no waiting allowed and nonessential retailers can offer curbside sales. Parks, tennis courts, dog parks and fields may reopen, but public pools, recreational centers and playgrounds cannot, and contact sports remain banned. The stay-at-home order was lifted, but residents must still maintain six feet of distance from others and wear face coverings while in businesses. Gatherings of more than 10 people are still prohibited.

Florida

  • Now open: Retail stores and restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Gyms and outdoor recreation. Sporting venues may operate without spectators.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, concert venues.

On April 29, the governor outlined Florida’s recovery plan, which began May 4 with a measured approach. Visits to senior-living facilities are still prohibited. Retail stores and restaurants reopened at 25 percent of indoor capacity throughout the state except in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

On May 1, the governor announced a limited reopening of recreational trails in state parks, including some beach access, with limitations.

On May 11, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen in most of the state with capacity limits. Sporting venues may operate without spectators.

On May 18, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties were allowed to reopen personal-care businesses, retail stores and restaurants at 25 percent of indoor capacity. Gyms could reopen statewide at 50 percent capacity.

Georgia

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, theaters and restaurant dine-in services. Bars and nightclubs.
  • Still closed: Live performance venues.

On April 20, the governor announced plans to ease restrictions and said some indoor facilities such as gyms and salons would be allowed to reopen April 24, as long as they comply with social distancing guidelines and other safety rules.

On April 27, restaurant dine-in services were allowed to resume, while theaters and private social clubs could reopen provided they meet specific guidelines.

On May 12, the governor issued an order that extended closures for certain businesses, such as bars and nightclubs, until May 31. The order allows child-care facilities to increase the number of people allowed in a single classroom from 10 to 20 with additional guidelines. Day camps can also resume if they meet specific guidelines.

On June 1, bars and nightclubs reopened with capacity limits and additional guidelines.

Hawaii

  • Now open: Retail businesses such as shopping malls, pet groomers and carwashes. Nonprofit organizations. Outdoor recreation.
  • Still closed: Restaurant dine-in services. Beaches can be used only for exercise.

On May 5, the governor announced the state would shift from a stay-at-home order to a safer-at-home order beginning May 7. Retail businesses such as shopping malls, pet groomers and carwashes, along with nonprofit organizations, can begin to reopen provided they meet specific guidelines.

Idaho

  • Now open: Restaurant dine-in services, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, places of worship, some retail stores.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, large venues such as movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced a four-stage plan to reopen the state beginning May 1, as long as certain criteria are met. The first stage of the plan allows places of worship to reopen, provided physical distancing requirements are met. Many retail stores can also reopen.

On May 16, the state entered its second stage of reopening, allowing personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops to reopen, along with indoor gyms and restaurant dine-in services.

On May 30, the state entered its third stage of reopening, which will allow bars, breweries and wineries to reopen at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Indoor movie theaters, outdoor pools and water parks also reopened with additional guidelines.

Illinois

  • Now open: State parks, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, golf courses and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, large venues such as movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced an extension to the stay-at-home order, while allowing retail stores to open for pickup and delivery beginning May 1.

On May 29, the state began the third phase of its reopening plan, which allowed nonessential businesses, such as in-person retail businesses, to reopen. Personal care services, such as barbershops and salons, can reopen with additional guidance. Fitness clubs can offer outdoor classes and one-on-one personal training with additional guidance. Gatherings are limited to 10 people. Face coverings in public are required. Bars and restaurants are only open for pickup and delivery. Chicago will begin the third phase on June 3.

Indiana

  • Now open: Retail stores, gyms, movie theaters, offices, places of worship, restaurant dine-in service, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Most outdoor recreation (including playgrounds, tennis and basketball courts, pools and campgrounds), nightclubs, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 1, the governor announced a five-stage plan to reopen the state. Most of the state entered the second stage May 4, which allowed retail businesses to open at 50 percent capacity. On May 8, places of worship were able to reopen.

On May 11, restaurants and bars began operating at 50 percent capacity, but bar seating remained closed. Personal services such as hair salons and barbershops could reopen by appointment.

On May 22, most of the state entered “Stage 3” of its reopening plan. Retail businesses and malls increased to 75 percent capacity, and gyms and fitness centers reopened with additional guidelines. Movie theaters reopened at 50 percent capacity. Bars and nightclubs remained closed, along with entertainment and sports venues. The remaining three counties moved on to “Stage 3” on June 1.

Iowa

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, bars, restaurant dine-in service, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On May 1, 77 of Iowa’s 99 counties that hadn’t had coronavirus cases or had seen a downward trend in infections over the previous two weeks began operating again with limited capacity.

On May 15, the remaining 22 counties were allowed to reopen gyms and restaurant dine-in services, and personal services such as hair salons and barbershops could reopen by appointment. Social gatherings of more than 10 people are still prohibited.

On May 22, movie theaters, museums and zoos were allowed to reopen.

On May 28, bars were allowed to reopen for indoor or outdoor seating at limited capacity and with additional guidelines.

On June 1, schools can reopen for school-sponsored activities.

There has been no statewide stay-in-place order.

Kansas

  • Now open: Gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, movie theaters, bowling alleys, restaurant dine-in services and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 30, the governor announced a multiphase plan to begin reopening the state May 4. Nonessential retail businesses and restaurants were allowed to reopen, provided physical distancing requirements are met.

On May 18, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops were allowed to open for appointments. Gyms may open, but in-person group classes may not occur.

On May 22, the state moved into the next of its reopening plan. Bowling alleys, movie theaters, state-owned casinos and other indoor leisure spaces were allowed to reopen. Bars, night clubs, swimming pools and large entertainment values will remain closed. People can gather in groups of up to 15 people.

Kentucky

  • Now open: Non-urgent health-care services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, churches, manufacturing companies and pet grooming services. Gyms, swimming pools and movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced the state would begin its first phase of reopening April 27, allowing non-urgent health-care services to resume.

On April 29, the governor announced the state’s tentative plan to begin reopening businesses. Manufacturing companies could resume work and horse-racing events could start again without fans beginning May 11.

On May 20, churches could open for services. Retail stores reopened at limited capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 22, restaurants opened for dine-in services with limited capacity and outdoor seating.

On May 25, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened with additional guidelines.

On June 1, movie theaters, swimming pools, gyms and fitness centers were allowed to reopen.

On June 29, bars and venues that hold 50 or fewer people can reopen if they meet additional guidelines.

Louisiana

  • Now open: Places of worship, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, theaters, gyms and restaurant dine-in services. Retails stores with exterior entrances. State parks, including overnight facilities for residents.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, retail stores, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, with several tweaks, including that restaurant patrons were now being allowed to eat their takeout food in outdoor seating areas as long as no employees serve them beginning May 1. Stores could also offer curbside pickup.

On May 15, the stay-at-home order was lifted and many nonessential businesses were allowed to reopen with occupancy limits, including places of worship, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, gyms, theaters and restaurants. State parks, including overnight facilities, could reopen for residents. The governor referred to this as the first phase of reopening.

Maine

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores and restaurant dine-in services in rural areas. Gyms for outdoor classes.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor outlined a plan for a “phased-in” reopening of the state’s economy.

On April 28, the governor announced a new stay-safe-at-home order, which will continue to have people stay home through May 31. The order, which began May 1, allows residents to visit businesses deemed safe to open under Stage 1 of the state’s reopening plan, which includes barbershops, hair salons and pet grooming locations.

On May 8, the governor announced that rural retail stores could reopen beginning May 11. Gyms and fitness centers began resuming outdoor classes May 11.

On May 18, restaurant dine-in services in rural areas began resuming with additional guidelines.

On June 1, gyms, fitness centers and nail salons were scheduled to open, but the governor delayed the reopening. The reopening of restaurant dine-in services in several counties was delayed as well.

Maryland

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, places of worship, retail stores, and personal-care businesses, such as salons and barbershops, by appointment only.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 15, the governor ordered residents to wear masks when they go out to stores.

On April 24, the governor announced a three-tiered plan to reopen but said it would begin only when data shows that the virus’s spread is under control and the health system is prepared for any spike in infections.

On May 6, the governor announced the state would slowly begin to ease the stay-at-home order, granting permission for certain outdoor activities and allowing doctors to schedule some elective surgeries, including dental work. State parks and beaches reopened May 7 for boating, camping, fishing and tennis.

On May 13, the governor announced he would lift the stay-at-home order that has shuttered most businesses and churches. Beginning May 15, some small shops and all religious organizations were allowed to operate at 50 percent capacity provided proper social distancing restrictions are followed — and local governments also say it is safe. Several jurisdictions, including Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, plan to keep restrictions in place.

Massachusetts

  • Now open: Places of worship, outdoor recreation, construction and manufacturing industries. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores for curbside pickup.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues

The governor has extended through May 18 his original order, which prohibits gatherings of more than 10 people. People can go out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing.

On May 11, the governor announced a four-phase plan to reopen the state beginning as soon as May 18, when “limited industries resume operations with severe restrictions.” The second phase would permit additional businesses to operate with limited capacity and certain conditions.

On May 18, the governor outlined the first phase of the state’s reopening plan. The stay-at-home advisory became a safer-at-home advisory. Construction and manufacturing industries were allowed to resume operations, and places of worship could reopen. Facial masks are required in public spaces when six feet of physical distance cannot be maintained.

On May 25, other parts of the state were allowed to reopen with capacity limits and additional guidelines, including beaches, drive-in movie theaters and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores were allowed to offer curbside pickup. Offices can open in most of the state, excluding Boston, which can reopen offices June 1.

Michigan

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation and construction businesses. Retail stores and auto showrooms by appointment only. Businesses and restaurant dine-in services in part of the state.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 9, the governor implemented additional restrictions for stores, specifying limits on the number of customers allowed in a store at one time based on floor space.

On April 27, the governor introduced a plan to start reopening the state’s businesses, which she said would be done at an “incremental” pace. Construction businesses were allowed to resume operations May 7.

On May 1, the governor signed a new executive order that extended various business closures and the emergency declaration until May 28.

On May 22, businesses and restaurants in northern Michigan reopened at reduced capacity under a new executive order the governor issued May 18. It allows bars and restaurants to operate at 50 percent capacity, with face coverings required for servers and six feet of distance between customers, as well as social gatherings of up to 10 people. The governor said the existing stay-at-home order affecting the rest of the state will remain in effect until May 28 unless decreases in the rate of new cases and deaths and increased testing indicates it is safe to revise them earlier.

On May 26, retail stores and auto showrooms reopened by appointment only and with a limit of 10 customers at a time.

On May 29, elective surgeries were allowed to resume.

Minnesota

  • Now open: Offices, outdoor recreation, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Bars and restaurants for outdoor dining.
  • Still closed: Gyms, nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor issued an order that allowed workers in industrial and office settings — specifically those who cannot work from home — to begin returning to work April 27, subject to several conditions.

On April 30, the governor announced an extension of Minnesota’s stay-at-home orders until May 18, while loosening some restrictions so some retailers could reopen in a limited capacity. Retailers could reopen for curbside pickup and delivery beginning May 4.

On May 18, retail stores and malls were allowed to reopen. People could gather in groups of up to 10. Restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops remained closed.

On June 1, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened at 25 percent capacity. Bars and restaurants were allowed to offer outdoor dining with additional guidelines.

Mississippi

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, and restaurant dine-in services. Amusement parks. Bars, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 24, the governor signed a safer-at-home order, lasting from April 27 to May 11, to begin reopening the economy. Under the order, retail stores could reopen as long as they limit customers to less than 50 percent of the store’s capacity.

A May 4 order allowed restaurants to allow dine-in services at 50 percent capacity beginning May 7, provided they meet additional guidelines.

On May 8, the governor extended the safer-at-home order to May 25, while allowing gyms, barbershops and salons to reopen with additional restrictions.

On May 21, casinos were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

On May 25, amusement parks and other outdoor places of recreation were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines and at 50 percent of the maximum occupancy.

On June 1, the stay-at-home order ended. All businesses were allowed to reopen, including bars and movie theaters, capacity limits and additional guidelines.

Missouri

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the first phase of the state’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” plan, which began reopening the state’s economy May 4. Retail stores were able to reopen, but must limit the number of customers based on the building’s square footage. Restaurants were able to reopen their dining rooms, along with other businesses such as barbershops, as long as physical distancing requirements are met. Places of worships are open. Gyms are also open. There are no limitations on social gatherings as long as physical distancing requirements are met.

Montana

  • Now open: Schools, outdoor recreation, places of worship, restaurant dine-in services, bars, retail stores, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Entertainment venues.

In an April 22 order, the governor announced a plan to begin a phased reopening of the state, with the stay-at-home order expiring April 26 for people and April 27 for businesses, including retail stores as long as they maintain physical distance and adhere to requirements to limit capacity. Personal-care services such as salons and barbershops were allowed reopen. Places of worship can also reopen. Restaurants and bars began providing some in-establishment services May 4.

On May 7, schools were allowed to reopen at the discretion of local school boards.

On May 15, movie theaters, gyms and museums were allowed to reopen.

On June 1, the state entered phase two of its reopening plan. Restaurants and bars were allowed to increase their dine-in capacity to 75 percent. Social gatherings are limited to 50 people. Concert halls, bowling alleys and other entertainment venues can operate at reduced capacity.

Nebraska

  • Now open in most of the state: Bars, gyms, places of worship, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs and movie theaters.

On April 24, the governor announced restrictions on social gatherings and business operations would be eased. Some businesses, including restaurants, salons and barbershops, were allowed to reopen May 4 in certain districts, but must limit seating to 50 percent of maximum occupancy. Places of worship also were able to reopen but must adhere to additional guidelines. Bars and movie theaters are among the businesses that must remain closed until at least May 31.

On June 1, bars reopened with capacity restrictions in most of the state. Some limited-contact and non-contact team sports resumed practicing. Gatherings are limited to 25 people.

No statewide order has been in place.

Nevada

  • Now open: Gyms, bars, movie theaters, outdoor recreation sites, retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues with spectators.

In an April 29 order, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while easing some restrictions beginning May 1. All retail businesses can now operate with curbside pickup, including marijuana dispensaries. Restrictions on outdoor activities, including golf and tennis, were also relaxed.

On May 7, the governor announced Nevada would enter the first reopening phase May 9, allowing certain nonessential businesses to reopen, including retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops to operate at reduced capacity.

On May 29, the stated entered its second reopening phase, which allows gyms, bars and indoor entertainment venues, such as movie theaters and malls, to reopen at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On June 4, Las Vegas casinos and resorts will reopen. At all casinos, occupancy limits in gaming areas will be cut in half, and group gatherings will be prohibited.

New Hampshire

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Restaurants can offer outdoor seating only.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 21, the governor announced a task force that will develop a plan to reopen the economy in several phases.

On May 1, the governor announced a modified stay-at-home order in effect until May 31. Under the new order, certain businesses such as golf courses, retail stores and salons began reopening May 11, with certain occupancy and physical distancing restrictions.

On May 18, restaurants could open outdoor seating areas with additional restrictions.

On June 1, additional personal-care businesses such as tanning and nail salons reopened with guidelines.

New Jersey

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, construction, retail stores for curbside pickup. Beaches, boardwalks and lakeshores. Elective surgeries.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the state would not begin reopening its economy until officials detect a 14-day trend of “appreciable and sustained” drops in new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

On April 29, the governor issued an order to reopen state parks and golf courses beginning May 2.

On May 18, nonessential retail businesses were allowed to reopen for curbside pickup. Nonessential construction resumed.

On May 22, beaches, boardwalks, lakes and lakeshores reopened with physical distancing measures.

On May 26, elective surgeries resumed.

New Mexico

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, pet services and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 6, the governor extended the emergency order, adding further restrictions, including limiting maximum occupancy in retail stores that qualify as essential businesses, such as grocery stores. These stores cannot exceed 20 percent of the occupancy limit as determined by the fire marshal.

On April 30, the governor modified the order to allow nonessential retailers to offer curbside pickup, beginning May 1. State parks and golf courses were allowed to reopen and pet services were permitted to operate. Nine additional state parks were allowed to reopen for day-use only on May 15.

On May 16, retailers were allowed to operate at 25 percent capacity. Entertainment venues remained closed. The governor announced that locations and services where close contact is unavoidable — such as gyms, salons, and dine-in service at restaurants and bars — will remain temporarily closed. Masks are required of everyone in public places, with exceptions for eating, drinking, exercising and medical requirements.

On June 1, gyms and restaurants were allowed to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity. Bars remain closed.

New York

  • Now open in some parts: Outdoor recreational activities, state beaches, elective surgeries, drive-in movie theaters and curbside pickup for retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

The governor extended a stay-at-home order on April 6 and increased the maximum fine for violating the state’s physical distancing policy from $500 to $1,000.

On April 27, the governor said some parts of the state would “unpause” May 15 as the first phase of a reopening plan.

On May 11, the governor announced that “certain low-risk businesses and recreational activities” could resume May 15, including landscaping, outdoor recreational activities and drive-in movie theaters. Additionally, each region in the state will have to meet seven metrics to start the four-phase reopening. In the first phase of reopening, construction, the manufacturing and wholesale supply chain, agriculture, forestry and fishing can resume operations. Retail stores can begin offering curbside pickup.

On May 13, elective surgeries resumed in most of the state.

On May 18, the governor said the state is “willing to partner with major sports teams that are interested in playing games safely, without fans.”

On May 22, state beaches reopened with limited capacity and additional guidelines.

On May 28, the governor signed an executive order authorizing businesses to deny entry to those who are not wearing face masks.

On May 29, the governor said five regions entered the second phase of reopening, which allows non-essential retail businesses and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines.

New York City is expected to begin the first phase of reopening the week of June 8, according to the governor.

North Carolina

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 5, the governor issued an order that modified the state’s stay-at-home order to begin easing restrictions May 8. Most retail businesses can reopen at 50 percent capacity. People are allowed to leave home for nonessential services. State parks and trails are encouraged to reopen. Bars, personal-care businesses, entertainment venues and gyms are among the businesses that remain closed. The order is in effect until May 22.

On May 22, the state entered phase 2, which allows restaurants to open dine-in services and personal care businesses such as salons and barbershops at 50 percent capacity. Gatherings are limited to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. Gyms, bars, nightclubs and indoor entertainment such as movie theaters will remain closed. The phase will last until at least June 26.

North Dakota

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, and movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Concert and sporting venues.

On April 29, the governor issued an order that suggested that many of the closed businesses — including bars, restaurants and salons — could reopen beginning May 1. Movie theaters can reopen at 20 percent capacity. Gyms can reopen with additional restrictions. Campgrounds and marinas began reopening May 9.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Ohio

  • Now open: Gyms, pools, offices, retail stores, construction sites, manufacturing and distribution companies. Restaurants and bar dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the state would reopen some health-care services May 1, and general offices, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies May 4. Retailers were allowed to reopen May 12.

On May 15, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops could reopen with additional guidelines. Restaurants and bars began offering outdoor dining dine-in services with additional guidelines.

On May 21, bars and restaurants began offering dine-in services.

On May 26, pools reopened with additional guidelines, including physical distance requirements. Face coverings are recommended when entering the facilities. Gyms and fitness centers also reopened. Some adult and youth sports leagues were allowed to resume.

Oklahoma

  • Now open: Places of worship, gyms, bars, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 22, the governor announced a three-stage plan to begin reopening the state starting April 24, when retail stores and personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons were allowed to reopen. State parks and outdoor recreation also were reopened. Restaurants, movie theaters, gyms, sporting venues and places of worship began reopening May 1 provided they adhere to physical distancing protocols. Bars remain closed.

On May 15, the governor announced the state would enter its second phase, which allowed bars to reopen, along with organized sports. Weddings and funerals are also allowed. Specific social distancing and sanitation guidelines remain in effect.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Oregon

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, some retail stores, gyms, bars and restaurants for dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops in approved counties.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced she would lift the order delaying non-urgent medical procedures beginning May 1, as long as health-care providers meet specific guidelines.

On May 5, the governor announced some state parks and outdoor recreation sites could begin to reopen May 6.

On May 7, the governor announced some counties could begin reopening May 15 if they meet all prerequisites as part of the first phase of Oregon’s reopening. As of May 8, the Oregonian reported that 32 of the state’s 36 counties had applied to reopen. The approved counties will be able to open restaurant dine-in services and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops with additional restrictions.

On May 15, some retailers, such as art galleries, jewelry shops and furniture stores, could reopen statewide. Approved counties can begin opening bars and restaurants for dine-in services, gyms, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops with additional restrictions.

Pennsylvania

  • Now open in certain regions: Restaurants and bars at limited capacity. personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershop. Outdoor recreation and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, nightclubs and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced certain businesses related to outdoor activities, such as golf courses, marinas and campgrounds, would reopen May 1.

On May 1, the governor announced the reopening of 24 counties beginning May 8, as part of his phased, color-coded plan. The reopened counties will move to the yellow phase, which means large gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited. Gyms, spas, hair salons, nail salons, casinos and theaters remain closed. Restaurants and bars are still limited to pickup and delivery. In-person retail is allowed in those counties.

On May 15, 13 more counties moved from the red to the yellow reopening phase.

On May 29, 17 counties moved from the yellow to the green reopening phase and eight counties moved from red to yellow. In the green phase, restaurants and bars can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Personal care services can reopen at 50 percent capacity, along with all entertainment, including casinos and theaters. Philadelphia is one of the eight counties still in the red phase.

On June 5, the remaining counties will move to the yellow reopening phase.

Puerto Rico

  • Now open: Construction and manufacturing companies. Restaurant dine-in services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Beaches.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 30, the governor announced certain parts of the economy could start to reopen. Smaller businesses, such as mortgage brokers, accountants and real estate agents, began reopening May 4. Construction and manufacturing companies began operating May 11. Beaches, parks and recreation centers will remain closed.

On May 26, beaches, restaurants, churches, hair salons and retail stores reopened with additional guidelines. Restaurants were allowed to operate at 25 percent capacity. Hair salons and barber shops could reopen by appointment only. The 7 p.m-to-5 a.m. curfew will remain in place until June 15 and all people will be required to wear a mask when outside or inside a business. Gyms and movie theaters remain closed.

Rhode Island

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, retail stores and offices.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 4, the governor detailed a multiphase plan for reopening the state May 9. In the first phase, the stay-at-home order would be lifted, some parks would reopen, elective medical procedures would be allowed, and some noncritical retailers could reopen with enhanced safety measures.

On May 11, the governor announced restaurants could begin offering outdoor dining May 18.

On May 25, two state beaches reopened at limited capacity. Bathrooms and concessions remain closed, and there is reduced parking.

On June 1, the state entered its second phase of reopening, which allows restaurants to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops to reopen with additional restrictions and gyms to reopen on a limited basis.

South Carolina

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurants dine-in services, retail stores and outdoor recreation, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Many attractions, including zoos and amusement park rides.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 20, the governor announced many retail outlets would be allowed to reopen, while local jurisdictions would determine public access to beaches.

On May 1, the governor announced the statewide “work-or-home” order would be lifted beginning May 4, allowing restaurants to begin offering outdoor seating with some additional requirements.

On May 11, restaurants were allowed to begin offering dine-services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 18, gyms and fitness centers could reopen and offer group classes. Public and commercial pools can reopen with additional guidelines. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops can reopen with additional guidelines.

On May 22, many attractions, including zoos, museums, aquariums, planetariums, water parks and amusement park rides, reopened with additional physical distancing guidelines.

South Dakota

On April 28, the governor announced a “Back to Normal” plan, which gives some general guidance to businesses. There have been no statewide restrictions throughout the crisis, although some cities ordered closures.

Tennessee

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, bars, gyms, retail stores, restaurants dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Large entertainment venues.

On April 20, the governor announced that stay-at-home orders would end April 30 and that some businesses, particularly in less-populated areas, could reopen April 27. Restaurants were allowed to reopen in 89 of the state’s 95 counties at 50 percent capacity beginning April 27. Gyms could also reopen at 50 percent capacity beginning May 1.

On April 29, the governor announced barber and beauty shops, as well as nail salons, could reopen May 6.

On May 22, capacity restrictions were lifted for restaurants and retail stores in most counties. Bars were allowed to reopen for customers at seated tables and with additional guidelines. Large entertainment venues, such as amusement parks and concert venues, were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines and capacity limits.

Texas

  • Now open: Gyms, in-person summer school classes, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, restaurant dine-in services and bars.

On April 17, the governor issued three orders centered on reopening the state. One allows retail outlets to reopen April 24, but items must be delivered to customers’ cars, homes or other locations to minimize contact.

On April 27, the governor said he would let his stay-at-home order expire and allow all retailers, movie theaters, museums, libraries and some health-care businesses to reopen at 25 percent capacity as part of the first phase of the state’s reopening starting May 1.

On May 6, the governor issued an order to allow gyms and exercise facilities to reopen at 25 percent capacity beginning May 18. Salons, barbershops and other personal-care businesses could reopen May 8, provided they meet additional physical distancing guidelines. Restaurants are allowed to offer dine-in services at 25 percent capacity.

On May 18, gyms and office buildings were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 22, the state entered its second phase of reopening. Bars, bowling alleys, bingo halls and rodeo events were allowed to open with additional guidelines, including occupancy limits.

On May 29, zoos and water parks were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity.

On May 31, certain professional sports leagues were allowed to reopen without fans. Recreational sports leagues were allowed to resume.

On June 1, in-person summer school classes were able to resume with additional guidelines.

U.S. Virgin Islands

  • Now open: Bars, restaurant dine-in services, Retail stores, private businesses, gyms, theaters, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops and public beaches.

On April 30, the governor issued a safer-at-home order to begin reopening the economy.

Starting May 4, private business offices were allowed to reopen, along with retail stores, gyms, bowling alleys, theaters, personal-care businesses and grooming services — with additional restrictions. People are required to wear a face mask when entering a business. Bars and nightclubs remain closed, and restaurants can offer only takeout, delivery or drive-through service.

Utah

  • Now open: Places of worship, bars, gyms, personal-care businesses, such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, bars, and restaurant dine-in services.

On April 29, the governor issued an order to begin reopening the state May 1. Gyms, salons and other personal-care businesses are among the establishments that can reopen, provided they meet specific guidelines. Restaurants can again offer dine-in options.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Vermont

  • Now open: Restaurant dine-in services, bars Retail businesses, outdoor recreation locations, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies.
  • Still closed: Gyms,and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 17, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen the state, with certain businesses able to reopen April 20.

On April 24, the governor outlined additional openings, including outdoor businesses, construction operations and recreation maintenance work, with a maximum of five workers per location, beginning April 27. Outdoor retail space could allow in-person shopping beginning April 27, with a maximum of 10 people.

On May 18, in-person retail businesses were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines, including occupancy limits.

On May 22, lodging operations including hotels, motels, short-term rentals and camping facilities reopened with additional guidelines.

On May 29, zoos reopened.

On May 31, overnight camps, youth sports and certain professional sports without fans reopened.

Virginia

  • Now open: Outdoor dining for bars and restaurants, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retailers, outdoor recreation facilities, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies.
  • Still closed: Gyms, nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 15, the governor extended his shutdown order for nonessential businesses — initially set to expire April 23 — until May 8.

On April 24, the governor released a blueprint for eventually easing public-health restrictions. He said Virginia will follow federal guidelines for deciding when to ease restrictions: The percentage of positive coronavirus tests and the number of hospitalizations must decline for 14 consecutive days, and the state must have ample hospital capacity and an “increasing and sustainable supply” of personal protective equipment.

On May 12, the governor announced that he signed an executive order allowing Northern Virginia to remain shut down as the rest of the state eased restrictions. He moved most of the state into phase one of his reopening plan starting on May 15, while allowing jurisdictions in the Washington suburbs to delay a gradual reopening until May 28. In phase one, nonessential retail can open at 50 percent capacity, restaurants are allowed to offer outdoor seating, and personal-care businesses could offer appointments. Gyms and fitness centers remain closed, along with entertainment venues.

Washington

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, restaurant dine-in services in some counties, retail stores for curbside delivery, gyms and personal-care services such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced a partial reopening of some outdoor recreational activities on May 5, including golf, hunting and fishing.

On May 1, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 31 and announced a four-phase plan to reopen the state.

On May 11, eight counties, many of them in rural eastern Washington, entered phase two. Restaurants in those communities that want to reopen will have to meet guidelines laid out by the governor’s office, which include keeping their dining rooms at half capacity and ensuring that buffets and salad bars remain closed.

West Virginia

  • Now open: Outdoor fishing. Gyms and fitness centers. Malls. Bars. Restaurants can offer indoor dining. Pet groomers, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops by appointment. Museums and zoos.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced a six-week plan to reopen the state beginning April 30, provided a “cumulative percent of positive test results remains below 3 percent” from April 27 to April 30.

On April 30, the governor announced a new “safer-at-home” order that went into effect May 4. Restaurants can offer outdoor service. Barbershops and hair and nail salons can take appointments. Pet groomers can reopen. Places of worship can reopen. Groups of more than 25 people are prohibited.

On May 15, outdoor fishing can resume with restrictions.

On May 21, restaurants began offering indoor dining at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Indoor shopping malls and state park campgrounds began reopening.

On May 26, indoor and outdoor bars reopened at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Museums and zoos reopened.

On June 5, casinos can reopen with additional guidelines.

Wisconsin

  • Now open in some of the state: Bars, gyms, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Schools.

On April 20, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen Wisconsin once there is a 14-day downward trajectory of positive coronavirus cases.

On April 27, the governor said the state would allow nonessential businesses to do curbside drop-off of goods and animals, making it possible for businesses such as dog groomers and repair shops to reopen.

On May 1, the governor reopened 34 state parks and forests.

On May 11, the governor issued an order allowing stand-alone or strip-mall-based retail stores to reopen with additional restrictions.

On May 13, the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s conservative majority sided with Republican legislators and struck down the decision by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers to extend a stay-at-home order. There was some initial confusion about whether the court had granted a stay until May 20, but it appeared the decision took effect immediately. The Tavern League of Wisconsin, which represents bar owners, told its members they could open.

On May 18, the governor abandoned plans to enforce statewide coronavirus measures after the state’s top court ruled in favor of Republican lawmakers who argued that Evers’s stay-at-home order exceeded his powers. He told reporters that his office is instead consulting with local officials to help them create their own orders. The state’s two largest cities, Milwaukee and Madison, kept the regulations they already had.

Wyoming

  • Now open: Restaurant dine-in services, bars and movie theaters, gyms, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.

On April 28, the governor announced that gyms, barbershops, hair salons and other personal-care businesses could reopen under specific operating conditions beginning May 1.

On May 15, movie theaters and performance venues could reopen with capacity limits. Gyms were allowed to open locker rooms. Child-care centers could have up to 25 people in a classroom. Restaurants were allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining. Gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited. National parks were allowed to reopen May 18.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.