For the fourth straight day, the United States has witnessed more than 1,000 deaths from the novel coronavirus, with 1,249 reported Thursday. The death toll nationwide was slightly lower than Wednesday, when 1,400 coronavirus-related deaths were reported, the worst day in more than two months for deaths from the disease.

Meanwhile, the illness continues to rattle the economy, which shrank a head-spinning 9.5 percent from April through June, the fastest the quarterly rate has fallen in modern record-keeping. At the same time, Congress is still clashing over a new coronavirus relief bill, with no deal reached on extending emergency unemployment benefits that expire on Friday or help for people facing evictions. Concerns are growing that the path to recovery could be delayed and more difficult.

Here are some significant developments:

  • Herman Cain, a former pizza chain executive and Republican presidential candidate, died after testing positive for the coronavirus. Though it is unclear where Cain contracted the disease, he attended a June Trump campaign rally in Tulsa that drew several thousand supporters, most of whom did not wear masks.
  • President Trump visited the American Red Cross headquarters on Thursday and urged people who have recovered from covid-19 to donate their plasma to help others fight the disease the virus causes. He also wore a face mask as he toured the facilities in Washington, the third time he has worn one in public.
  • Baseball’s Philadelphia Phillies announced that two staff members tested positive for the coronavirus. No Phillies players have tested positive, but the team’s three-game series this weekend against the Toronto Blue Jays has been postponed, and all activity at Citizens Bank Park has been canceled.
  • Children may have as much of the coronavirus in their respiratory systems as adults, a new study says, complicating Trump’s assertion that children are safer from the virus than older people.
  • About 1 in 5 U.S. adults packed up and moved because of the pandemic — or they know someone who did, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. The likelihood of someone moving or knowing someone who moved is greatest with higher levels of education and income.