The Washington PostDemocracy Dies in Darkness

A deal on coronavirus stimulus bill remains elusive as Pelosi’s deadline looms

A week after President Trump tapped Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court nominee, he and several attendees at the event have tested positive for coronavirus. (Video: The Washington Post, Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reported signs of progress in the ongoing negotiations over a new coronavirus relief bill Monday night, but her fellow Democrats and the Trump administration remained far apart after a day of lobbing attacks at one another.

Pelosi (D-Calif.) spoke to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, her Trump administration interlocutor, for an hour Monday, one day before the deadline Pelosi set to get stimulus legislation passed before the Nov. 3 election.

On MSNBC on Monday night, Pelosi said, “We have finally in the last 24 hours … come to a place where they are willing to address the crisis.”

That note of cautious optimism came after President Trump accused Pelosi of stalling and posited that it would hurt Democrats at the polls. Pelosi, meanwhile, insisted to colleagues that she wants to pass legislation before the election because she doesn’t want to carry “the droppings of this grotesque elephant into the next presidency.”

Here are some significant developments:

  • About 285,000 more people in the United States died this year than what was anticipated due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, with nearly 67 percent dead from the disease itself, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.
  • The number of officially confirmed coronavirus cases has surpassed 40 million worldwide, as new surges in the United States and Europe are raising concerns about an escalation of the pandemic. The United States continues to report more cases than any other country.
  • The Trump administration’s pandemic response is increasingly plagued by infighting, lethargy and the president’s mistrust of his government’s top scientists, according to interviews with 41 White House officials, public health leaders and others.
  • Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, said he was “absolutely not” surprised when Trump contracted the novel coronavirus soon after attending a Rose Garden ceremony last month for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett where few people wore masks.
  • Large school districts across the country are reopening campuses to students, a slow-moving reversal driven by concern that students are falling behind and early evidence that schools have not become the coronavirus superspreaders it was feared they might be.
  • More than 8,170,000 coronavirus cases and 219,000 fatalities have been reported in the United States since February, and a surge of infections is shattering records in states that previously escaped the worst of the pandemic. Many Republican governors are resisting new measures to stop the spread.
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Here's what to know:

About 285,000 more people in the United States died this year than what was anticipated due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, with nearly 67 percent dead from the disease itself, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.
The number of officially confirmed coronavirus cases has surpassed 40 million worldwide, as new surges in the United States and Europe are raising concerns about an escalation of the pandemic. The United States continues to report more cases than any other country.
The Trump administration’s pandemic response is increasingly plagued by infighting, lethargy and the president’s mistrust of his government’s top scientists, according to interviews with 41 White House officials, public health leaders and others.
Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, said he was “absolutely not” surprised when Trump contracted the novel coronavirus soon after attending a Rose Garden ceremony last month for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett where few people wore masks.
Large school districts across the country are reopening campuses to students, a slow-moving reversal driven by concern that students are falling behind and early evidence that schools have not become the coronavirus superspreaders it was feared they might be.
More than 8,170,000 coronavirus cases and 219,000 fatalities have been reported in the United States since February, and a surge of infections is shattering records in states that previously escaped the worst of the pandemic. Many Republican governors are resisting new measures to stop the spread.

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