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Fauci says U.S. rates declining but coronavirus not yet under control

Security personnel keep watch outside the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan, China, on Feb. 3 during a visit by a World Health Organization team tasked with investigating the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

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Coronavirus cases in the United States are falling again but the virus is not yet under control, Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, said Wednesday.

“We had an acceleration. We had a peak. … All three of the parameters — cases, hospitalizations and deaths — are going down. But we have got to do better than that.”

The comments from the White House’s chief medical adviser come amid hope that the summer surge fueled by the highly contagious delta variant of the virus is ebbing. Fauci, who is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said that reaching “the kind of normal that we are all craving” would be possible through a greater vaccination rate.

Here’s what to know

  • The World Health Organization named more than two dozen scientists to a new multinational advisory team to investigate the origins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and prepare for any future pandemics.
  • Those who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine may need a booster shot — and may derive even greater protection if the booster comes from a different vaccine technology.
  • Doctors in the United States are bracing for a “twindemic” of flu and coronavirus spikes. Here’s how to tell the two apart.
  • Congressional Democrats called on the Biden administration to bring new pressure on Moderna and potentially disclose details of the company’s mRNA vaccines, as tensions build over whether the company has sufficiently shared its know-how with the developing world.
  • Foreign tourists with proof of full vaccination against the coronavirus will be allowed to enter the United States via its overland borders with Canada and Mexico as of November, the White House announced late Tuesday.
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Here's what to know:

The World Health Organization named more than two dozen scientists to a new multinational advisory team to investigate the origins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and prepare for any future pandemics.
Those who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine may need a booster shot — and may derive even greater protection if the booster comes from a different vaccine technology.
Doctors in the United States are bracing for a “twindemic” of flu and coronavirus spikes. Here’s how to tell the two apart.
Congressional Democrats called on the Biden administration to bring new pressure on Moderna and potentially disclose details of the company’s mRNA vaccines, as tensions build over whether the company has sufficiently shared its know-how with the developing world.
Foreign tourists with proof of full vaccination against the coronavirus will be allowed to enter the United States via its overland borders with Canada and Mexico as of November, the White House announced late Tuesday.

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Coronavirus: What you need to know

Vaccines: The CDC recommends that everyone age 5 and older get an updated covid booster shot. New federal data shows adults who received the updated shots cut their risk of being hospitalized with covid-19 by 50 percent. Here’s guidance on when you should get the omicron booster and how vaccine efficacy could be affected by your prior infections.

New covid variant: The XBB.1.5 variant is a highly transmissible descendant of omicron that is now estimated to cause about half of new infections in the country. We answered some frequently asked questions about the bivalent booster shots.

Guidance: CDC guidelines have been confusing — if you get covid, here’s how to tell when you’re no longer contagious. We’ve also created a guide to help you decide when to keep wearing face coverings.

Where do things stand? See the latest coronavirus numbers in the U.S. and across the world. In the U.S., pandemic trends have shifted and now White people are more likely to die from covid than Black people. Nearly nine out of 10 covid deaths are people over the age 65.

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