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Jan. 6 hearings, Day 4 recap Panel links Trump to fake electors plan

On June 21, the Jan. 6 committee outlined a scheme it said was supported by President Donald Trump to overturn the 2020 election. (Video: Adriana Usero/The Washington Post)

Arizona House Speaker Russell “Rusty” Bowers (R) on Tuesday told the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection that he resisted repeated overtures from President Donald Trump and his allies to change his state’s 2020 presidential election results because he saw no evidence supporting Trump’s claims of fraud and didn’t want to be “used as a pawn.”

Georgia state officials also testified, including Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger (R), whom Trump asked to “find” enough votes to flip the election in that state, and his deputy, Gabe Sterling. During his testimony, Raffensperger debunked multiple claims of fraud that Trump used to pressure him. The committee also heard from Shaye Moss, a Georgia election worker who was wrongly accused of committing election fraud by Trump and his allies. She was subject to vile attacks as a result.

What you need to know

  • Rep. Bennie G. Thompson (D-Miss.), the chairman of the House select committee, said that “pressuring public servants into betraying their oaths was a fundamental part of the playbook” for Trump in trying to overturn the election results.
  • Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), a Jan. 6 panel member, played a lead role in Tuesday’s hearing. Schiff said Trump’s repeated false claims fomented death threats and harassment against state legislators and election officials.
  • Trump directly tapped Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and her organization to get involved in his quest to overturn the 2020 election, according to testimony.
  • In video testimony, Robert Sinners, a former Trump campaign staffer, said he felt as if those who participated in the effort to field slates of fake electors in seven states were “kind of useful idiots or rubes.”
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Here's what to know:

Rep. Bennie G. Thompson (D-Miss.), the chairman of the House select committee, said that “pressuring public servants into betraying their oaths was a fundamental part of the playbook” for Trump in trying to overturn the election results.
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), a Jan. 6 panel member, played a lead role in Tuesday’s hearing. Schiff said Trump’s repeated false claims fomented death threats and harassment against state legislators and election officials.
Trump directly tapped Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and her organization to get involved in his quest to overturn the 2020 election, according to testimony.
In video testimony, Robert Sinners, a former Trump campaign staffer, said he felt as if those who participated in the effort to field slates of fake electors in seven states were “kind of useful idiots or rubes.”

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The Jan. 6 insurrection

Congressional hearings: The House committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol held a series of high-profile hearings to share its findings with the U.S. public. In what was likely its final hearing, the committee issued a surprise subpoena seeking testimony from former president Donald Trump. Here’s a guide to the biggest hearing moments so far.

Will there be charges? Committee chair Rep. Bennie G. Thompson (D-Miss.) said the committee will make criminal referrals to the Department of Justice, though no decision has been made on the target of a referral.

The riot: On Jan. 6, 2021, a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to stop the certification of the 2020 election results. Five people died on that day or in the immediate aftermath, and 140 police officers were assaulted.

Inside the siege: During the rampage, rioters came perilously close to penetrating the inner sanctums of the building while lawmakers were still there, including former vice president Mike Pence. The Washington Post examined text messages, photos and videos to create a video timeline of what happened on Jan. 6. Here’s what we know about what Trump did on Jan. 6.

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