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George Zimmerman’s wife Shellie seeks divorce

The wife of George Zimmerman, who was acquitted in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin after a murder trial that became the focus of a national debate on race, is filing for divorce from her husband. According to court documents, Shellie Zimmerman, 26, and her husband separated Aug. 13. She told ABC’s “Good Morning America” that her husband has only spent a few nights at home since his acquittal in July.

In the interview with ABC, Shellie Zimmerman explained some of her reasons for wanting to leave her husband. “I have a selfish husband, and I think George is all about George,” she said, adding that he spoke abusively to her and that the highly public trial had ruined her life.

She also said that her husband has been making “some reckless decisions.” Police have stopped Zimmerman twice for speeding since his acquittal. He was traveling at 60 mph in a 45 mph zone in Lake Mary, Fla., on Tuesday, police said.

He was also pulled over in Texas in July. Opinion writer Jonathan Capehart describes that incident:

George Zimmerman, the killer of Trayvon Martin, was found not guilty of second-degree murder last month. But I find him guilty of committing the super-obnoxious “don’t you know who I am?!” offense.

The free man who went underground after his July 13 acquittal was stopped for speeding by Texas highway patrol. When asked by the officer where he was headed, Zimmerman can be heard in the dashcam video replying, “Nowhere in particular.” That struck the patrolman curious so he asked why.

Zimmerman: You didn’t see my name?

Officer: Nuh-uh. … What a coincidence!

Yeah, what a coincidence. The former neighborhood watch volunteer who killed Trayvon with a concealed weapon also had a concealed weapon with him in his truck. “Go ahead and shut your glove compartment,” the officer told him. “Don’t play with your firearm.” The weapon at the center of his trial is still in federal custody. Zimmerman was let off with only a warning.

Even though Zimmerman didn’t try to make a big deal of it, you’d think the man who has to live in hiding because he fears for his safety would keep a lower profile. Driving like an extra from “Fast and Furious” was bound to attract attention.

Jonathan Capehart

The couple have no children. In her petition for divorce, Shellie Zimmerman is seeking sole possession of their two dogs, Oso and Leroy.

Shellie Zimmerman told ABC, “I have supported him for so long, and neglected myself for too long, and I feel like I’m finally starting to feel empowered again.” For more on a previous interview with ABC in which Zimmerman discussed pleading guilty to perjury for statements she made about their finances during her husband’s case, continue reading here.

Max Ehrenfreund writes for Wonkblog and compiles Wonkbook, a daily policy newsletter. You can subscribe here. Before joining The Washington Post, Ehrenfreund wrote for the Washington Monthly and The Sacramento Bee.


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