Back in the early ’90s, something like 10 million people played a video game called Doom, in which a nameless hero fought his way through a Martian-type landscape, killing increasing hordes of demons from hell. With violent 3-D graphics and multi-player ability, it was a pioneer in the first-person-shooter genre.

Now, Haniya Rae reports on Popsci.com, a construction company called DIRTT (Doing It Right This Time) is designing hospital wings and office spaces using software based on Doom’s open-source engine. The software takes traditional blueprints and turns them into a 3-D image, allowing contractors that provide plumbing, wiring and so on to coordinate on virtual walls right from the start of a project. The idea — appealing to anyone who has ever renovated a kitchen — is to eliminate the costs and delays that come when diverse crews run into unexpected problems. “An engineer or architect can use [the software] to mock up a room and create a live data set for every aspect of a space, including the electrical engineering, millwork and piping. When those blueprints are taken into the shop, everything is constructed at the same time and put together so that there are no inconsistencies.”

Scott Jenkins, president of DIRTT, says the same Doom-based system will also help hospitals that want to reconfigure a room’s wall panel quickly for patients with different needs or to accommodate new technology.

Not as exciting as killing demons, maybe, but it sounds satisfying.

Back in the early ’90s, something like 10 million people played a video game called Doom, in which a nameless hero fought his way through a Martian-type landscape, killing increasing hordes of demons from hell. With violent 3-D graphics and multi-player ability, it was a pioneer in the first-person-shooter genre.

Now, Haniya Rae reports on Popsci.com, a construction company called DIRTT (Doing It Right This Time) is designing hospital wings and office spaces using software based on Doom’s open-source engine. The software takes traditional blueprints and turns them into a 3-D image, allowing contractors that provide plumbing, wiring and so on to coordinate on virtual walls right from the start of a project. The idea — appealing to anyone who has ever renovated a kitchen — is to eliminate the costs and delays that come when diverse crews run into unexpected problems. “An engineer or architect can use [the software] to mock up a room and create a live data set for every aspect of a space, including the electrical engineering, millwork and piping. When those blueprints are taken into the shop, everything is constructed at the same time and put together so that there are no inconsistencies.”

Scott Jenkins, president of DIRTT, says the same Doom-based system will also help hospitals that want to reconfigure a room’s wall panel quickly for patients with different needs or to accommodate new technology.

Not as exciting as killing demons, maybe, but it sounds satisfying.