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Women found faces of riders who performed better at the Tour de France more attractive

The Colombian cyclist Nairo Quintana, seen in San Luis, Argentina, took second place in the Tour de France in 2013. In a study, women found faces of riders who performed better at the Tour de France more attractive. (Prensa Tour San Luis/Handout/EPA)
Women like the looks of fast cyclists

Study Hall presents recent studies as described by researchers and their institutions. This report is from the University of Zurich.

In a range of species, females show clear preferences when it comes to the choice of their partner: They decide on the basis of external features like antler size or plumage coloration whether a male will be a good father to her offspring or whether he will provide them with good genes. An evolutionary biologist at the University of Zurich has now demonstrated that humans have similar skills. The faces of riders who performed better during the Tour de France were deemed more attractive, showing that we can assess a man’s endurance performance by looking at his face.

During the course of human evolution, hunting success and, by extension, feeding a family depended on the ability to chase game for hours and days. “That’s why endurance performance was a key evolutionary factor,” says the researcher, Erik Postma. Given the benefits that a physically fit partner would have provided, the researcher hypothesized that facial attractiveness has evolved to signal, among others, endurance performance. If correct, then women should find those men who perform well in terms of endurance particularly attractive.

To test this hypothesis, the scientist found his ideal study subjects in the participants of the 2012 Tour de France. “The Tour de France is the ultimate test when it comes to endurance performance,” Postma explains. But although they are all fit, there are still considerable differences in their performance. More than 800 people, both women and men, rated the portraits of 80 of the riders in terms of facial attractiveness, without knowing how fast they were. Subsequently, the evolutionary biologist measured the performance of each rider on the basis of how long it took them to complete the three time trials and the complete race. He then related this to the attractiveness ratings each rider received and found that riders rated as more attractive had also fared better during the race. “Attractive riders are, therefore, faster,” Postma says in summation.

The link between attractiveness and physical performance was strongest in women who were not using a hormonal contraceptive. These women found the faces of men who did well in the race to be particularly attractive. By contrast, the preference for fast riders was less pronounced in both women on the pill and in men. “These results are in line with other studies showing that hormones play an important role when assessing potential sexual partners,” Postma says.



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