TEXAS
Ruling on redrawing districts put on hold

Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. on Monday gave Texas a temporary reprieve from complying with a lower court’s order to start redrawing congressional districts it ruled were discriminatory.

A three-judge panel in San Antonio found two of the state’s 36 congressional districts were drawn to diminish the influence of minority voters. It scheduled a court hearing next week to begin the process of redrawing the districts.

Texas on Friday asked the Supreme Court to stay the lower court’s decision.

Alito, who handles emergency filings from Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana, put the lower court’s order on hold until the Supreme Court heard from Democrats and the voting rights groups that had mounted the challenge. He called for the plaintiffs’ response by next Tuesday.

— Robert Barnes

NEW MEXICO
Two killed, four hurt in library shooting

Two people were killed and four were injured in a shooting inside a public library in Clovis, N.M., on Monday, city officials said.

City Manager Tom Phelps told the Eastern New Mexico News that the alleged shooter was taken into custody. Clovis is about 200 miles east of Albuquerque, near the Texas state line.

— Associated Press

ILLINOIS
Governor signs bill on immigrant protections

Illinois will limit how local and state police can cooperate with federal immigration authorities under a plan signed into law Monday by Gov. Bruce Rauner, a move that puts the first-term Republican at odds with his party on immigration.

The narrow measure prohibits police from searching, arresting or detaining someone solely because of immigration status or because of federal immigration detainers. But local authorities will be able to communicate with immigration agents and hold someone for immigration authorities if there’s a valid criminal warrant, according to the new law. It takes effect immediately.

Proponents say the measure falls short of a “sanctuary” law because it leaves the door open to communication and ensures the state complies with federal law. The move comes as President Trump has threatened to crack down on sanctuary cities, which have laws friendly to immigrants living in the United States without legal permission.

— Associated Press