U.S. Embassy attacker said to be ex-soldier

The man who hurled a bomb into the U.S. Embassy compound in Montenegro’s capital and then killed himself was an ex-soldier apparently decorated by then-Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic after NATO’s bombing of Serbia and Montenegro in 1999, authorities said Thursday.

A police official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, said the man was 43-year-old Dalibor Jaukovic, who was identified by a relative.

At a news conference, police formally identified the suspect by his initials. They said that he had no criminal record and that the attack was not an act of terrorism. Police said they are investigating his motives and whether he acted alone.

Photos posted on Jaukovic’s Facebook profile include a plaque honoring his contribution in the fight against NATO during the bombing. The plaque seems to be personally signed by Milosevic.

Police said earlier that a man threw a bomb into the embassy yard and then killed himself by activating another one around midnight Wednesday.

The blast created a crater but caused no other material damage to the property, the statement said. The embassy said all staff members are safe.

Police said Jaukovic was a Montenegrin citizen born in neighboring Serbia.

Many in Montenegro remain opposed to the country’s NATO membership because of the air campaign the alliance waged to stop the war in Kosovo when Montenegro was still part of Yugoslavia.


Palestinian killed in raid captured on video

A 33-year-old Palestinian man was killed early Thursday by Israeli troops who are seen on a security camera video kicking and beating him with their rifles after he comes charging down an alley, carrying a long object on his shoulder.

The Israeli military confirmed that the video showed parts of a predawn arrest raid in the West Bank town of Jericho.

An army statement initially said that Palestinians attacked troops during the raid and that an armed man tried to grab a soldier’s gun. In a later statement, it said the man ran toward soldiers with an iron rod and tried to attack them.

The statement said troops responded “by opening fire, confronted the terrorist at close proximity and managed to block him.” It added that a knife was found on the man.

The grainy video shows an alley lined by storefronts. A man is seen throwing stones in the direction of soldiers who are in one of the stores.

Seconds later, a man is seen charging down the alley carrying a long object with three legs, like a tripod, on his shoulder. He is heading in the direction of the store where the soldiers are. Once he is level with the store, one of the soldiers jumps out, aiming his rifle at him.

The man drops to the ground. The soldier kicks him and beats him with his rifle. Other troops join in, also kicking and beating him, before pulling him into the store. At a later point, four soldiers are seen carrying him across the alley.

The military said the incident is under investigation.

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