Joshua Feuerstein calls out Starbucks for its new holiday cups in a widely viewed online video posted to his Facebook page. (Facebook/Joshua Feuerstein)

The frenzy over Starbucks use of generic red cups for the holiday season without a direct ode to Christmas began with a video rant from a self-described “disciple of Jesus” and now the latest hero of the anti-political correctness crowd.

But Josh Feuerstein has been at this for years, posting hundreds of videos of himself screaming mini-sermons into his Iphone camera.

While he has almost 2 million followers on Facebook, (it’s not clear how many of those became fans after the Starbucks takedown went viral) most people had no idea who Feuerstein was before this week. It’s also unclear whether any notable Christian groups have joined his boycott, and some are vocally opposing it.

[Most Christians don’t actually care about Starbucks cups]

Feuerstein has long been on the radar of liberal groups, as the left-leaning Web site Daily Kos, detailed in an article Tuesday. They  first learned of him when he recorded himself calling a Florida bakery to order a cake with the message: “We Do Not Support Gay Marriage.” When the bakery refused to fill the order, he and his followers cried discrimination and harassed the small business until it was forced to temporarily close.

Feuerstein told The Washington Post in an e-mail that he’s preparing a libel suit against the Daily Kos. He was unavailable to comment further at publication time.

Feuerstein’s often incendiary views are part of his whole public persona. Appearing on CNN Monday, he says America is a Christian nation because why else would “Obama have to pretend to be one to get elected?” The other guest on the segment, Pete Dominick, a talk radio host, attacked Feuerstein as a “entrepreneurial bigot.”

Feuerstein’s personal Web site biography describes him as “an American evangelist, internet and social media personality.” It boasts that “his charisma and his bold, passionate and distinctive communication style resonates with the Millennial Generation.”

For a minimum of $10, $20, or $50 monthly, Feuerstein offers partnerships to help him spread his message of “hope and healing” to his community of 5 million “hurting and helpless” people. His Web site doesn’t detail what the various tiers get you.

He also sells a DVD with “nearly 60 minutes of real, raw and relevant discussion about life, hurts, depression, hope, faith and so much more!!!”

One of his more popular videos was from May 2014, garnering almost 2 million views for a nearly five-minute take down of evolution. At the end he urges people to share the video and friend him. “I say it’s time we start to believe in intelligent design and God,” he says in closing.

In another video from September, he says the “Christian Holocaust has begun” after Kentucky clerk Kim Davis was sent to jail for refusing to sign a gay marriage license. “It is time for us to rise up, and begin a revolution,” he says, encouraging people to “invade” Rowan County where Davis worked. That one got almost 1 million views.

Post columnist Alexandra Petri jumps into the Starbucks red cup debate, and she's got a thing or two to say about the history and symbols of Christmas. (Gillian Brockell/The Washington Post)

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