When sockeye salmon swim upstream, bears fill the Brooks Falls area at Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. (National Park Service)

If you’ve ever seen images of bears coolly chomping fish that appear to jump straight into the predators’ mouths, chances are good they were shot at Brooks Falls in Alaska’s Katmai National Park and Preserve. It’s basically an al fresco salmon buffet for bears.

And if you’ve ever wondered whether mama bears are as protective as their reputation makes them out to be, take a look at this charming video of one Brooks Falls parent known to her Internet following as Grazer. Earlier this week, while Grazer and her trio of cubs were taking advantage of the final days of the salmon run, she watched the wee brown bundles spill over the (okay, pretty small) waterfall. She appears to scold the babes, then she leaps down to round them up.

The folks at explore.org, which runs the Brooks Falls bear cam in partnership with the national park, report that the cubs came out unscathed.

Like many of the endless number of wildlife cams that allow people to watch animals from their desks, this one is super popular. It’s expensive and difficult to reach Brooks Falls, so for most of us, this is the only way to see the Katmai bears. And during the summer months, it’s jam-packed with live-streamed bear-fishing action.

Sometimes, it looks so easy.

 

But there are plenty that get away.

Fortunately, it’s not all fishing, because even watching bears fish can be dull after a while. For respite, the cam also features plenty of bear cub exploration and mishaps.

Read more:

These adorable foxes, once nearly extinct, have made a record-breaking comeback 

Pedals, a bear that walks upright, is back — and so is the fight about helping him 

Feds to Alaska: Stop killing bears and wolves on our land 

Watch an eagle snatch an osprey from a nest like it’s no big deal