The Alabama Shakes, Kendrick Lamar and Taylor Swift took home top prizes at the 58th annual Grammy Awards on Feb. 15, while The Eagles, Adele and the Hollywood Vampires were among some of the night's most talked about performances. (Erin Patrick O'Connor/The Washington Post)

A tribute- and ballad-heavy Grammys ceremony felt overlong and slightly outdated (hasn’t “Uptown Funk” been out for five years?), but there were still standout moments.

A captivating performance by Kendrick Lamar was certainly the highlight of the night. But despite racking up five trophies, Lamar lost out on some of the biggest awards of the ceremony — again. Ed Sheeran won for song of the year and Taylor Swift picked up best album for “1989.” And, of course, the ubiquitous “Uptown Funk” received record of the year.

The complete list of Monday night’s 83 Grammy winners.

THE SHOW (in reverse chronological order)

Pitbull kicked off the show’s big finale performance, surprising the crowd when an unbilled, untweeted Sofia Vergara turned up on the Grammys stage to shimmy and shake it to the music — and pretty well, we might add.

For the rest of the medley, the rapper was joined by Robin Thicke, who, for reasons we can’t understand, was tapped to perform despite the fact that the man hasn’t released an album since 2013 and that he’s spent the intervening years totally mucking up his public image. We’re not sure how he scored an invite, much less stage time, which tends to go to musicians who aren’t rapidly sliding their way down the B-list.

But there he was, playing sidekick to Pitbull, uber-drummer Travis Barker and Aerosmith’s Joe Perry, who turned up to play a screechy solo.


“Let’s go Beyonce, let’s do it,” Bruno Mars shouted at the singer moments before she prepared to announce the winner of the record of the year award. Did she give him a cue? Did she look in his direction? Whatever happened, he seemed to know “Uptown Funk” — his track with Mark Ronson — was bound to win.


Taylor Swift wins album of the year for “1989,” and this time, her surprised face is understandable: She was up against some really tough competition, including Kendrick’s Lamar’s “To Pimp a Butterfly.”

“I want to thank the fans for the last 10 years,” Swift said. “As the first woman to win album of the year at the Grammys twice, I want to say to all the young women out there: There are are going to be people along the way who try to undercut your success or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame, but if you just focus on the work and you don’t let those people sidetrack you, someday when you get where you’re going, you will know that it’s you and the people that love you that puts you there.”


Twelve-year-old pianist Joey Alexander immediately makes every musician feel bad about themselves as he performs a flawless solo on stage.


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Johnny Depp, Alice Cooper and Joe Perry take the stage with their new rock supergroup the Hollywood Vampires and it’s… scary. Are we referring to Cooper’s blood-spattered shirt and riding crop? Depp’s guitar skills? All the pyrotechnics in the background? Let’s just say it’s all of the above and so much more.

depp


 

The magnetic Brittany Howard, in a white cape dress, put on a magnetic, aching performance of Alabama Shakes’ funky “Don’t Wanna Fight.” The band snagged their first Grammy ever tonight, winning for best rock song and best rock performance. 

Who are Alabama Shakes?
An Alabama blues-rock band fronted by Brittany Howard, a singer with a hurricane-force voice.

Why are they here?
The band is vying for album of the year, best rock performance, best rock song (for “Don’t Wanna Fight”) and best alternative music album awards. They snagged three noms back in 2013, but left statue-less.

Songs you might recognize?
“Hold On,” Alabama Shakes’ 2012 breakout, was ubiquitous, played everywhere from SNL to the neighborhood Starbucks. The funkier “Don’t Wanna Fight” was last year’s follow-up banger.


Grammys tribute hour continues: In other words, go get a snack or take your bathroom break now. Anyway, Chris Stapleton, the toast of Nashville for the last four months, kicks off the B.B. King tribute with “The Thrill is Gone,” soon joined by Bonnie Raitt and Gary Clark Jr.


 

bowie

First things first: Lady Gaga’s tribute to David Bowie, who died last month of cancer, wasn’t a tribute. It wasn’t a series of cover songs. Lady Gaga donned an orange wig and raced through a series of tunes to be the embodiment of Bowie. The opening moments of her performance teased out this idea, as the images projected onto her face melted and transformed, and transformed Gaga in the process.

From there, the singer shapeshifted, across sounds and eras — she started with “Space Oddity” and “Fame” and a handful of other Bowie high notes — as often as Bowie had. She sung in a low key, and moved and sneered like Bowie. It was strange, this impersonation act, but on second thought, strange is interesting. And that’s what this Grammys needs, pretty desperately.

SOGOOD


Meghan Trainor, 22, wins the coveted best new artist trophy, despite the fact that her breakout “All About That Bass” was released in June 2014. Trainor weeps as she takes the stage, thanking her parents for believing in her — and the camera wisely cuts to her dad, also crying in the audience.

Who is Meghan Trainor?
Remember the saccharine empowerment earworm  “All About That Bass”? That’s Trainor.

Why is she here? Though “All About That Bass” has been around since 2014, the singer is  vying for the best new artist award, and tonight, she’s teamed up with John Legend, Demi Lovato, Luke Bryan and Lionel Richie.

Songs you might recognize? Besides “All About That Bass,” the singer doo-wops with Legend on the song “Like I’m Gonna Lose You.”


Bieber breaks out the guitar and vocals for an acoustic version of “Love Yourself,” his latest hit song co-written with Ed Sheeran. BUT THAT’S BORING. Soon he heads over to Diplo and Skrillex for “Where Are U Now,” which won Bieber his first Grammy earlier in the night for best dance recording. The words are indecipherable, but it’s all about the dance moves, which Bieber knows as he rips his jacket off about halfway through the performance.


Adele. Adele. Adele. The powerhouse singer was, for many, one of the hot acts to see at the Grammys, given that she had one of the biggest hits of the year with “Hello,” but to sit through her performance was to wonder: Was that a little flat? Like, a lot flat?

As she performed the ballad “All I Ask,” from her newest album, “25,” we couldn’t help but ask ourselves that question, and then grunt a little, then shake our heads.


Alabama Shakes picks up best rock performance for “Don’t Wanna Fight.” Lead singer Brittany Howard looks pretty stunned, but there’s still a big category left to go: They’re also up for album of the year.

 


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Kendrick Lamar, up for nine awards tonight, and the winner of five before he had even performed, didn’t play a song so much as play out history on the Grammy stage. The beginning of his set was a prison scene, with Lamar at the front of the chain gang as he sang “The Blacker the Berry,” its gunshot-like beats causing a shudder among the dancers, before gliding seamlessly into the #BlackLivesMatter anthem “Alright” with a fiery bonfire as the backdrop. Black lights, quick-cut editing, the words “Compton” lighted up over a map of Africa — this performance had it all. But more importantly, it had everything the other performances (Lionel Richie’s excepted) did not: energy, spark, meaning and gravity.

Lamar has won for best rap performance, best rap/sung collaboration, best rap song, best rap album and best music video. He was nominated twice in the music video and best rap song categories. He lost in the song of the year, best dance recording and best pop duo/group performance categories. He’s still in contention for album of the year honors. So, he’s 5 for 8 with one to go.


Gwen Stefani didn’t get a performance slot on the Grammys, but she did get a “live music video” for her new song “Make Me Like You,” which also happens to double as a Target commercial.


No surprise in the best musical theater album category… It took a musical as huge as “Hamilton” to get that category in the televised telecast. It’s worth it, though, as creator Lin-Manuel Miranda raps his acceptance speech.

From New York, the cast of Broadway’s hugely successful musical “Hamilton” performed the rap-inflected “Alexander Hamilton,” which not unexpectedly, made for a weird fit in the night’s broadcast, thanks to the long jackets and ruffled shirts and actual singing and dancing and joy, which the Grammys seem to have banned.


Who are the cast of “Hamilton”?
The better question: What is “Hamilton”? Lin-Manuel Miranda created and stars in this hip-hop-inflected Broadway musical about America’s OG treasury secretary, Alexander Hamilton.

Why are they here?
Since it opened last August, the unlikely musical — think “8 Mile,” but with big song-and-dance numbers and pantaloons — has become one of the hottest tickets in New York. (Side note: Technically, the cast won’t be at the Grammys. They’re belting out the number from the Richard Rogers Theatre in New York, and being beamed into the proceedings via television magic.)

Songs you might recognize?
“Alexander Hamilton,” the musical’s opening number, isn’t exactly blasting from club speakers. But it played pretty well with the first lady when Miranda performed it at the White House.


Tori Kelly and James Bay, both up for best new artist, stand on the tiny circle stage and face each other with guitars and sing really slow songs in a show that has seen many, many slow songs.

Who is Tori Kelly?
She’s a 23-year-old California pop singer who got her start on YouTube. That’s where uber-manager Scooter Braun (the guy who discovered Justin Bieber on YouTube) found her in 2013. The gears of the star machine started cranking, and here she is.

Why is she here?
She’s up for best new artist, one of the top four prizes of the night.

Song you might recognize:
Her ballad-with-a-beat-plus-an-unnecessary-cameo-rap-verse-from-Big-Sean, “Hollow.”

Who is James Bay?
He’s a 25-year-old Brit whose balladeering sounds like the long echo of David Gray, or maybe the shorter echo of Ed Sheeran.

Why is he here?
He has been nominated for best new artist.

Song you might recognize.
Bay’s drowsy radio hit “Let It Go” is not to be confused with the ubiquitous tune from the “Frozen” soundtrack, with which it shares only its title.


The Eagles band members and Jackson Browne pay tribute to the late Glenn Frey with “Take It Easy,” and some in the audience look a little teary.

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Though he was presenting with Pentatonix, it was Stevie Wonder who got to read the name of the winner of the song of the year award.  “You can’t read it, you can’t read Braille, na-na-na-na-na-na!” he exclaimed playfully, in what was one of the ceremony’s more authentic moments.

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Song of the year awards go to songwriters, and among the contenders were Lamar; Ed Sheeran; and Max Martin, for his song for Taylor Swift. But Sheeran, the singer-songwriter from England, seemingly stole the award out from under them with a nod for “Thinking Out Loud.” (It was his second award of the night; the first was for best pop solo performance.) After dodging a minor freakout from Swift on his way to the podium, he expressed awe that he’d been given the statue by Stevie Wonder, and then moved along.

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On stage, Ryan Seacrest notes that Little Big Town’s “Girl Crush” faced some resistance getting played by country radio. The song had a very slow climb early on (some stations, and the band, noted they were facing some misunderstanding about what “Girl Crush“ was actually about). But as the band has also pointed out, the actual controversy was the fact the tune — which won country song and best country duo/vocal group performance earlier in the night — was “a 6-8 ballad about jealousy and heartache” that actually became a hit on country radio and then surged to the top of the charts.


Rihanna reportedly has canceled her Grammy performance tonight, according to TMZ. According to the gossip site, she attended rehearsals and was at L.A.’s Staples Center, but avoided the red carpet.


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The Grammys honored Lionel Richie, who had kind of a big year as Adele’s “Hello” put his own “ back in the spotlight for an Internet minute.

John Legend kicked things off with “Easy,” the Commodores hit. But we could have done without a half-hearted tribute that included Demi Lovato, who sang “Hello” like a pageant contestant. Richie didn’t seem to mind — he was clearly enjoying the show. But what did Luke Bryan and Meghan Trainor and surprise guest Tyrese — who knew the model could sing!? —  have to do with the legendary crooner?

At least they elevated the mood before Richie, who somehow has managed to avoid aging, showed everyone how it’s done.    

 


Seems not everyone is enthralled with the Grammy Awards so far:


No shocker there: Chris Stapleton wins best country album for “Traveller,” the record that catapulted him to fame beyond Nashville last fall when he achieved a big sweep of the CMA Awards. “I’d like to thank Taylor Swift for glitter bombing me before,” Stapleton said during his speech.

Who is Chris Stapleton?
He’s a Nashville songwriter who made his biggest waves at November’s Country Music Association Awards by duetting with Justin Timberlake and winning armfuls of prizes.

Why is he here?
Stapleton is hoping to win the Grammy for best new artist. (He’s already won for best country solo performance.)

Songs you might recognize:
“Tennessee Whiskey” and “Nobody To Blame” both shot up the charts after Stapleton’s big night at the CMAs.


Andra Day and Ellie Goulding sang a mash-up of their songs “Rise Up” and “Love Me Like You Do,” respectively. 

Who is Ellie Goulding?

She’s a British pop singer who has graced more than a few big EDM singles with her singular voice. She also performed at Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding a few years back.

Why is she here?
“Love Me Like You Do,” which appeared on the “Fifty Shades of Gray” soundtrack, is up for best pop solo performance.

Songs you might recognize:
In addition to “Love Me Like You Do,” perhaps you’ve heard Goulding’s glitchy-great “On My Mind” on your radio.

Who is Andra Day?
She’s a retro-minded R&B singer from San Diego whose singing draws from gospel and doo-wop.

Why is she here?
Her single “Rise Up” is nominated for best R&B performance. Her debut album “Cheers to the Fall” is nominated for best R&B album.

Song you might recognize:
If you haven’t heard the gospel-ish “Rise Up,” maybe you’ve heard “Forever Mine,” a song whose video was directed by Spike Lee.


The Weeknd, one of the past few years’ brightest young stars, had to follow Ariana Grande singing one of his songs in an awkward lead-in to his performance. But have no fear, he upstaged her — not hard, people  —  with what turned out to be a medley that started with “I Can’t Feel My Face,” and then abruptly shifted gears to “In the Night.”

But did the audience want to hear the Weeknd do a slow jam? No, it did not. The applause that followed was… polite.

Who is The Weeknd?
He’s an incredibly popular R&B singer from Toronto with a Michael Jackson-ish voice and an iconic hairdo all his own.

Why is he here?
He’s up for seven awards, including record of the year and album of the year.

Songs you might recognize:
His 2015 album, “Beauty Behind the Madness,” produced two chart-topping singles, the upbeat “Can’t Feel My Face” and the downtempo “The Hills.”


Sam Hunt, country music’s latest breakout sensation, follows Swift with “Take Your Time” — coincidentally, a song he performed with Swift as a guest on her massive stadium tour this summer. Carrie Underwood joins him to turn the song into a duet, then immediately segues into her new single “Heartbeat.” Hunt lends backup vocals on the song anyway, so it’s a perfect fit. While they look great together, they’re both a tad awkward enough on stage to make the whole thing lack… a little chemistry.

Who is Sam Hunt?
He’s a Nashville music newcomer who blends country and hip-hop with artful elegance — really!

Why is he here?
He’s up for the big best new artist prize, as well as best country album for his excellent debut, “Montevallo.”

Songs you might recognize:
“Leave the Night On,” “Take Your Time” and “House Party” all went No. 1 on the U.S. country charts.


Ice Cube and his mini-me O’Shea Jackson Jr. were the ideal presenters to award the Best Rap Album award, which went to Lamar for “To Pimp A Butterfly,” as was widely predicted.  Cube’s rap crew N.W.A famously came from Compton, and last weekend, Lamar got the key to the city. Adele, Taylor Swift and plenty of others in the front rows gave Lamar a standing ovation for the win, the first of the ceremony.

“Hip Hop. Ice Cube… This is for ‘Illmatic,” he said in his acceptance speech. “This is for Nas, we will live forever, believe that.”

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We could hear that joking coming from a mile away. LL Cool J just introduced Adele to Lionel Richie: “Adele, Lionel Richie, say hello.”


Taylor Swift kicks things off in a sparkly black jumpsuit with “Out of the Woods,” her latest single from “1989.” Oh there’s Jack Antonoff, a producer on the album as well — and boyfriend of her BFF/squad member Lena Dunham. Lots of vocal acrobatics, perhaps trying to prove people how much she’s grown since her infamously panned Grammy performance with Stevie Nicks in 2010.

The opening number of the Grammys is a power position — Beyonce and Jay Z famously debuted “Drunk in Love” on that stage a couple of years ago. Tonight, despite Swift claiming the top spot, her performance of “Out of the Woods” was a much more uneventful performance.


NEWS

Swift racked up two early awards: best pop vocal album and best music video for “Bad Blood” alongside Lamar. Swift (seven nominations) still has five more chances to earn a Grammy tonight, with nominations for best pop solo performance, best pop duo (also with Lamar), and record, song and album of the year. In addition to best music video, Lamar (11 noms) has won two other prizes: best rap performance for “Alright,” and best rap/sung collaboration for “These Walls” (which features Bilal, Anna Wise and Thundercat). “Alright” also won for best rap song, which goes to songwriters (Lamar wasn’t on the writing team).

Lamar, Swift and The Weeknd  (seven nominations) will compete for Album of the Year, the biggest prize of the night, along with Alabama Shakes and Chris Stapleton. You can find a complete list here.

RED CARPET

John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s first child is arriving this spring, and the couple confirms that Kim and Kanye (well, mostly Kim) gave them fertility advice. The more you know.


Was Lady Gaga crying as she had her makeup done for tonight’s tribute to David Bowie? Or does having three pounds of blue eyeshadow slapped on your eyelids sometimes mean there are going to be casualties?

The world loves you David.

A post shared by xoxo, Gaga (@ladygaga) on


 

While other celebrities are having their gowns lint-rolled, Kanye West is spending those quiet few moments before the ceremony unleashing a tweet tornado, much of it about the reviews of his new album, “The Life of Pablo,” which was officially released this weekend. You’d think the reviews were bad, judging by his tweets. But no, they were, at worst, mixed, and at best, a 9 out of 10 from the fawning tastemakers over at Pitchfork. (Not that it was good enough for West.)


 


Singer Sam Hunt. (Jason Merritt/Getty Images for NARAS)

Mullets and tuxedos are proving a theme among the ladies on the red carpet tonight. Zendaya and Pentatonix’s Kirstin Maldonado both turned up rocking surprising mullets, complete with long, skinny tails. Zendaya also wore a baggy suit, while Demi Lovato topped her look with a tuxedo jacket.

https://twitter.com/marieclaire/status/699379111584788481


It’s a night of firsts on the red carpet. Justin Bieber scooped up his first win ever, earning a trophy  for best dance recording with Skrillex and Diplo for the hit “Where Are U Now.” Ed Sheeran also won the first Grammy of his career at the pre-ceremony for best pop solo performance for “Thinking Out Loud.”


Alice Cooper just hit Johnny Depp with a riding crop on the red carpet, so that’s one sign of how this Grammys is going to go. The two of them (along with Joe Perry) are now in a rock group, the Hollywood Vampires, making its debut tonight.


Taylor Swift is getting a lot of attention on the red carpet already, thanks to her brightly color-blocked tube top/skirt combination and new bob. Swift is walking with her BFF Selena Gomez, who appeared in her (now Grammy-winning) “Bad Blood” music video.


Courtney Barnett’s red-carpet appearance was super-awkward, and kind of awesome.

A few people in the audience are definitely going to be confused when the name Courtney Barnett is called out with the rest of the Best New Artist nominees. But shouldn’t E! host Giuliana Rancic have been slightly more prepared for what she’d ask the night’s most unexpected — but not undeserving — nominee? She didn’t ask who Barnett was wearing, but that makes sense because it looks like the Australian rocker, whose deft songwriting has won her comparisons to Bob Dylan and made her a critical darling, turned up in a Gap button-down and jeans.

Instead Rancic asked her if she’d ever heard any of the other nominees. “I just listened to their music… recently …and it’s cool,” Barnett said, generously not scoffing at the questions.


 

COMPLETE LIST OF WINNERS

1. RECORD OF THE YEAR
Uptown Funk
Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars
Track from: Uptown Special
Label: RCA Records

2. ALBUM OF THE YEAR
1989
Taylor Swift
Label: Big Machine Records

3. SONG OF THE YEAR
Thinking Out Loud
Ed Sheeran & Amy Wadge, songwriters (Ed Sheeran)
Track from: X
Label: Atlantic; Publisher(s): Sony/ATV Music Publishing/BDi Music Limited

4. BEST NEW ARTIST
Meghan Trainor

5. BEST POP SOLO PERFORMANCE
Thinking Out Loud
Ed Sheeran
Track from: X
Label: Atlantic

6. BEST POP DUO/GROUP PERFORMANCE
Uptown Funk
Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars
Track from: Uptown Special
Label: RCA Records

7. BEST TRADITIONAL POP VOCAL ALBUM
The Silver Lining: The Songs Of Jerome Kern
Tony Bennett & Bill Charlap
Label: RPM Records/Columbia Records

8. BEST POP VOCAL ALBUM
1989
Taylor Swift
Label: Big Machine Records

9. BEST DANCE RECORDING
Where Are Ü Now
Skrillex And Diplo With Justin Bieber
Sonny Moore & Thomas Pentz, producers; Sonny Moore & Thomas Pentz, mixers
Track from: Skrillex And Diplo Present Jack Ü
Label: Owsla/Mad Decent/Atlantic

10. BEST DANCE/ELECTRONIC ALBUM
Skrillex And Diplo Present Jack Ü
Skrillex And Diplo
Label: Owsla/Mad Decent/Atlantic

11. BEST CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM
Sylva
Snarky Puppy & Metropole Orkest
Label: Impulse!

12. BEST ROCK PERFORMANCE
Don’t Wanna Fight
Alabama Shakes & Blake Mills, producers; Shawn Everett, engineer/mixer; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer
Label: ATO Records

13. BEST METAL PERFORMANCE
Cirice
Ghost
Label: Loma Vista Recordings

14. BEST ROCK SONG
Don’t Wanna Fight
Alabama Shakes, songwriters (Alabama Shakes)
Label: ATO Records; Publisher(s): Alabama Shakes Publishing

15. BEST ROCK ALBUM
Drones
Muse
Label: Warner Bros. Records

16. BEST ALTERNATIVE MUSIC ALBUM
Sound & Color
Alabama Shakes
Label: ATO Records

17. BEST R&B PERFORMANCE
Earned It (Fifty Shades Of Grey)
The Weeknd
Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Label: Universal Studios/Republic Records

18. BEST TRADITIONAL R&B PERFORMANCE
Little Ghetto Boy
Lalah Hathaway
Label: Entertainment One/8th Floor

19. BEST R&B SONG
Really Love
D’Angelo & Kendra Foster, songwriters (D’Angelo And The Vanguard)
Track from: Black Messiah
Label: RCA Records; Publisher(s): Ah Choo Music Publishing/12:00 AM Music admin. by Universal Polygram International Publishing, Ear Kandy Music, Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

20. BEST URBAN CONTEMPORARY ALBUM
Beauty Behind The Madness
The Weeknd
Label: Republic

21. BEST R&B ALBUM
Black Messiah
D’Angelo And The Vanguard
Label: RCA Records

22. BEST RAP PERFORMANCE
Alright
Kendrick Lamar
Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly
Label: Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath Records/Interscope Records

23. BEST RAP/SUNG COLLABORATION
These Walls
Kendrick Lamar Featuring Bilal, Anna Wise & Thundercat
Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly
Label: Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath Records/Interscope Records

24. BEST RAP SONG
Alright
Kendrick Duckworth, Kawan Prather, Mark Anthony Spears & Pharrell Williams, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)
Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly
Label: Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath Records/Interscope Records; Publisher(s): WB Music Corp./Hard Working Black Folks Publishing/EMI April Music, Inc./Even More Water From Nazareth/Sounwave TDE Productions/Sony ATV/In Thee Face Music Publishing/BMG Gold Songs

25. BEST RAP ALBUM
To Pimp A Butterfly
Kendrick Lamar
Label: Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath Records/Interscope Records

26. BEST COUNTRY SOLO PERFORMANCE
Traveller
Chris Stapleton
Track from: Traveller
Label: Mercury Nashville

27. BEST COUNTRY DUO/GROUP PERFORMANCE
Girl Crush
Little Big Town
Track from: Pain Killer
Label: Capitol Records Nashville

28. BEST COUNTRY SONG
Girl Crush
Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna & Liz Rose, songwriters (Little Big Town)
Track from: Pain Killer
Label: Capitol Records Nashville; Publisher(s): Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Songs Of Crazy Girl Music, Songs of Universal, Inc., Hoodie Songs, HillarodyRathbone Music admin. by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

29. BEST COUNTRY ALBUM
Traveller
Chris Stapleton
Label: Mercury Records

30. BEST NEW AGE ALBUM
Grace
Paul Avgerinos
Label: Round Sky Music

31. BEST IMPROVISED JAZZ SOLO
Cherokee
Christian McBride, soloist
Track from: Live At The Village Vanguard (Christian McBride Trio)
Label: Mack Avenue Records

32. BEST JAZZ VOCAL ALBUM
For One To Love
Cécile McLorin Salvant
Label: Mack Avenue Records

33. BEST JAZZ INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM
Past Present
John Scofield
Label: Impulse!

34. BEST LARGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ALBUM
The Thompson Fields
Maria Schneider Orchestra
Label: ArtistShare

35. BEST LATIN JAZZ ALBUM
Made In Brazil
Eliane Elias
Label: Concord Jazz

36. BEST GOSPEL PERFORMANCE/SONG
Wanna Be Happy?
Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin, songwriter
Label: RCA Records/Fo Yo Soul Recordings; Publisher(s): Aunt Gertrude Music Publishing admin. by Universal Music-Brentwood Benson Songs and Irving Music, Inc. admin. by Universal Music Publishing

37. BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC PERFORMANCE/SONG
Holy Spirit
Francesca Battistelli
Track from: If We’re Honest (Deluxe Edition)
Label: Fervent/Curb/Word

38. BEST GOSPEL ALBUM
Covered: Alive In Asia [Live]
Israel & NewBreed
Label: RGM NewBreed/RCA Inspiration

39. BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC ALBUM
This Is Not A Test
Tobymac
Label: ForeFront Records

40. BEST ROOTS GOSPEL ALBUM
Still Rockin’ My Soul
The Fairfield Four
Label: Fairfield Four Records

41. BEST LATIN POP ALBUM
A Quien Quiera Escuchar (Deluxe Edition)
Ricky Martin
Label: Sony Music Latin

42. BEST LATIN ROCK, URBAN OR ALTERNATIVE ALBUM
Dale
Pitbull
Label: Mr. 305 / Sony Music Latin

43. BEST REGIONAL MEXICAN MUSIC ALBUM (INCLUDING TEJANO)
Realidades – Deluxe Edition
Los Tigres Del Norte
Label: Fonovisa

44. BEST TROPICAL LATIN ALBUM
Son De Panamá
Rubén Blades With Roberto Delgado & Orchestra
Label: Ruben Blades Productions

45. BEST AMERICAN ROOTS PERFORMANCE
See That My Grave Is Kept Clean
Mavis Staples
Track from: Your Good Fortune
Label: Anti

46. BEST AMERICAN ROOTS SONG
24 Frames
Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell)
Track from: Something More Than Free
Label: Southeastern Records; Publisher(s): Songs Of Emchant

47. BEST AMERICANA ALBUM
Something More Than Free
Jason Isbell
Label: Southeastern Records

48. BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM
The Muscle Shoals Recordings
The Steeldrivers
Label: Rounder

49. BEST BLUES ALBUM
Born To Play Guitar
Buddy Guy
Label: RCA Records/Silvertone Records

50. BEST FOLK ALBUM
Béla Fleck And Abigail Washburn
Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn
Label: Rounder

51. BEST REGIONAL ROOTS MUSIC ALBUM
Go Go Juice
Jon Cleary
Label: FHQ Record

52. BEST REGGAE ALBUM
Strictly Roots
Morgan Heritage
Label: CTBC Music Group

53. BEST WORLD MUSIC ALBUM
Sings
Angelique Kidjo
Label: 429 Records

54. BEST CHILDREN’S ALBUM
Home
Tim Kubart
Label: Tim And The Space Cadets

55. BEST SPOKEN WORD ALBUM (INCLUDES POETRY, AUDIO BOOKS & STORYTELLING)
A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety
Jimmy Carter
Label: Simon & Schuster Audio

56. BEST COMEDY ALBUM
Live At Madison Square Garden
Louis C.K.
Label: Comedy Dynamics

57. BEST MUSICAL THEATER ALBUM
Hamilton
Daveed Diggs, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Jonathan Groff, Christopher Jackson, Jasmine Cephas Jones, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom, Jr., Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos & Phillipa Soo, principal soloists; Alex Lacamoire, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Bill Sherman, Ahmir Thompson & Tarik Trotter, producers; Lin-Manuel Miranda, composer & lyricist (Original Broadway Cast)
Label: Atlantic

58. BEST COMPILATION SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA
Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
(Various Artists)
Julian Raymond, compilation producer
Label: Big Machine Records

59. BEST SCORE SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA
Birdman
Antonio Sanchez, composer
Label: Milan Records

60. BEST SONG WRITTEN FOR VISUAL MEDIA
Glory
Lonnie Lynn, Che Smith & John Stephens, songwriters (Common & John Legend)
Track from: Selma
Label: Def Jam/ARTium Records; Publisher(s): BMG Sapphire Songs/John Legend Publishing/Reach Music Songs/Think Common Music Inc/Universal Music – MGB Songs

61. BEST INSTRUMENTAL COMPOSITION
The Afro Latin Jazz Suite
Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra Featuring Rudresh Mahanthappa)
Track from: Cuba: The Conversation Continues
Label: Motema Music

62. BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTAL OR A CAPPELLA
Dance Of The Sugar Plum Fairy
Ben Bram, Mitch Grassi, Scott Hoying, Avi Kaplan, Kirstin Maldonado & Kevin Olusola, arrangers (Pentatonix)
Track from: That’s Christmas To Me
Label: RCA Records

63. BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTS AND VOCALS
Sue (Or In A Season Of Crime)
Maria Schneider, arranger (David Bowie)
Track from: Nothing Has Changed
Label: Legacy/Columbia

64. BEST RECORDING PACKAGE
Still The King: Celebrating The Music Of Bob Wills And His Texas Playboys
Sarah Dodds, Shauna Dodds & Dick Reeves, art directors (Asleep At The Wheel)
Label: Bismeaux Records

65. BEST BOXED OR SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION PACKAGE
The Rise & Fall Of Paramount Records, Volume Two (1928-32)
Susan Archie, Dean Blackwood & Jack White, art directors (Various Artists)
Label: Third Man Records / Revenant Records

66. BEST ALBUM NOTES
Love Has Many Faces: A Quartet, A Ballet, Waiting To Be Danced
Joni Mitchell, album notes writer (Joni Mitchell)
Label: Rhino

67. BEST HISTORICAL ALBUM
The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11
Steve Berkowitz, Jan Haust & Jeff Rosen, compilation producers; Peter J. Moore & Mark Wilder, mastering engineers (Bob Dylan And The Band)
Label: Columbia/Legacy

68. BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, NON-CLASSICAL
Sound & Color
Shawn Everett, engineer; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Alabama Shakes)
Label: ATO Records

69. PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, NON-CLASSICAL
Jeff Bhasker
• Ain’t Gonna Drown (Elle King) (T) • Burning Doves (Mikky Ekko) (T) • Burning House (Cam) (T) • Grand Romantic (Nate Ruess) (A) • Last Damn Night (Elle King) (T) • Never Let You Down (Woodkid Featuring Lykke Li) (T) • Runaway Train (Cam) (T) • Uptown Special (Mark Ronson) (A)

70. BEST REMIXED RECORDING, NON-CLASSICAL
Uptown Funk (Dave Audé Remix)
Dave Audé, remixer (Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars)
Label: RCA Records

71. BEST SURROUND SOUND ALBUM
Amused To Death
James Guthrie, surround mix engineer; James Guthrie & Joel Plante, surround mastering engineers; James Guthrie, surround producer (Roger Waters)
Label: Columbia/Legacy

72. BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, CLASSICAL
Ask Your Mama
Leslie Ann Jones, John Kilgore, Nora Kroll-Rosenbaum & Justin Merrill, engineers; Patricia Sullivan, mastering engineer (George Manahan & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra)
Label: Avie Records

73. PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, CLASSICAL
Judith Sherman
• Ask Your Mama (George Manahan & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra) • Fields: Double Cluster; Space Sciences (Jan Kučera, Gloria Chuang & Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra) • Liaisons – Re-Imagining Sondheim From The Piano (Anthony de Mare) • Montage – Great Film Composers & The Piano (Gloria Cheng) • Multitude, Solitude (Momenta Quartet) • Of Color Braided All Desire – Music Of Eric Moe (Christine Brandes, Brentano String Quartet, Dominic Donato, Jessica Meyer, Karen Ouzounian, Manhattan String Quartet & Talujon) • Rzewski: The People United Will Never Be Defeated! (Ursula Oppens) • Sirota: Parting The Veil – Works For Violin & Piano (David Friend, Hyeyung Julie Yoon, Laurie Carney & Soyeon Kate Lee) • Turina: Chamber Music For Strings & Piano (Lincoln Trio)

74. BEST ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE
Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphony No. 10
Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)
Label: Deutsche Grammophon

75. BEST OPERA RECORDING
Ravel: L’Enfant Et Les Sortilèges; Shéhérazade
Seiji Ozawa, conductor; Isabel Leonard; Dominic Fyfe, producer (Saito Kinen Orchestra; SKF Matsumoto Chorus & SKF Matsumoto Children’s Chorus)
Label: Decca

76. BEST CHORAL PERFORMANCE
Rachmaninoff: All-Night Vigil
Charles Bruffy, conductor (Paul Davidson, Frank Fleschner, Toby Vaughn Kidd, Bryan Pinkall, Julia Scozzafava, Bryan Taylor & Joseph Warner; Kansas City Chorale & Phoenix Chorale)
Label: Chandos

77. BEST CHAMBER MUSIC/SMALL ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE
Filament
Eighth Blackbird
Label: Cedille Records

78. BEST CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL SOLO
Dutilleux: Violin Concerto, L’Arbre Des Songes
Augustin Hadelich; Ludovic Morlot, conductor (Seattle Symphony)
Track from: Dutilleux: Métaboles; L’Arbre Des Songes; Symphony No. 2, ‘Le Double’
Label: Seattle Symphony Media

79. BEST CLASSICAL SOLO VOCAL ALBUM
Joyce & Tony – Live From Wigmore Hall
Joyce DiDonato; Antonio Pappano, accompanist
Label: Erato

80. BEST CLASSICAL COMPENDIUM
Paulus: Three Places Of Enlightenment; Veil Of Tears & Grand Concerto
Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer
Label: Naxos

81. BEST CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL COMPOSITION
Paulus: Prayers & Remembrances
Stephen Paulus, composer (Eric Holtan, True Concord Voices & Orchestra)
Track from: Paulus: Far In The Heavens
Label: Reference Recordings

82. BEST MUSIC VIDEO
Bad Blood
Taylor Swift Featuring Kendrick Lamar
Joseph Kahn, video director; Ron Mohrhoff, video producer
Label: Big Machine Records

83. BEST MUSIC FILM
Amy
(Amy Winehouse)
Asif Kapadia, video director; James Gay-Rees, video producer
Label: Universal Music Group

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