Nelly performs onstage during Tim McGraw’s Superstar Summer Night on April 8, 2013 in Las Vegas. (Ethan Miller/Getty)

What a rare opportunity: to perform an anonymous act of kindness that requires so little of you, brings you joy and, when done en masse, makes a big impact.

We’re talking about helping Nelly.

Upon learning of a TMZ report that the IRS had slapped the St. Louis rapper with a $2.4 million tax lien, fans flocked to support him by streaming his music. The suggestion first came from SPIN, which did the math: In a best case scenario, using an estimated Spotify royalty payout per stream, Nelly fans would need to stream “Hot In Herre” at least 287,176,547 times to pay off the reported lien.

The people rallied:

https://twitter.com/lifewithhalfpts/status/776075630140088320

Now let’s check the boards.

(A sad screenshot)
(A sad screenshot.)

As of 11:30 a.m., “Hot In Herre,” which had made its way to No. 38 on the hip-hop iTunes charts, racked up at least 60,108,586 Spotify plays. According to my calculations, this just won’t do: 60,108,586 < 287,176,547. We’ve reached out to Spotify to get a more precise accounting of how often “Hot In Herre” has been streamed this week compared to recent weeks. The streaming service’s viral and top charts were last updated eight hours ago.

Also, “The Fix”? How is “The Fix” beating “Hot In Herre?” How is anything beating “Hot In Herre?”

It is with “Hot In Herre” that we experience Nelly in his full, early aughts, sing-songy flow glory. The 2002 hit got many a party started, provided us with catchy lines (“good gracious, a– is bodacious”) and reintroduced the world to the godfather of go-go Chuck Brown (“Hot In Herre” pays homage to Brown’s 1978 classic “Bustin Loose.”)

Also, the hook: “It’s getting hot in herre (so hot)/So take off all your clothes.”

What a solution! Sure, the body heat generated by a group of barely clad individuals in an already hot room isn’t a more effective cooling mechanism than, say, cranking the air conditioning. But it is a more cost-conscious and eco-friendly approach. Thanks for caring about the environment, Nelly.

The rapper — whose music has prompted many aunties to hit the wedding dance floor, isn’t afraid of a good ol’ fashioned country crossover and has done numerous good works, such as establishing college scholarship funds — deserves our help. Streaming “Hot In Herre” is an easy and delightful way to show our appreciation. Now, let’s get back to it.

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