Josh Duggar (Danny Johnston/AP)

Reality-television star Josh Duggar, who on Thursday apologized and resigned from his post with the Family Research Council following allegations that he molested several underage girls during his teenage years, has previously alluded to his “failures,” temptations and “wrong thoughts” as a young man. In 2014, the four oldest Duggar sisters — Jill, Jinger, Jessa and Janna — published a book titled “Growing Up Duggar: It’s All About Relationships,” in which they invited Josh, now 27, and his wife, Anna, to discuss their courtship and marriage. The discussion includes the following passage by Josh:

As I became a young man I was constantly tempted to have lots of wrong thoughts and often battled to keep my heart right. One of the greatest things that helped me in my struggles was my parents’ commitment to accountability. They were faithful to talk with each one of us children — if we were willing to share honestly and openly with them — to maintain a clear conscience. I learned quickly that great freedom can be achieved by accountability but that deep accountability requires humility and openness. I often had failures in my early teenage years but I found that I had a clear conscience only when I was willing to confess my thoughts quickly to God and to my parents. (See 1 John 1:9).

The Bible passage Duggar cites: “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.”

More Washington Post coverage of the Duggars:

In faith communities like the Duggars, abuse victims are encouraged to be filled with grace. It’s not that simple.

TLC pulls ’19 Kids and Counting’ citing ‘heartbreaking situation

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