A customer pushes a cart outside a Staples Inc. store in Torrance, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013. Staples Inc., the world’s largest office-supplies chain, slumped the most in a year after cutting its annual profit forecast because of declines in its retail and international business. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg
(Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg)

Staples said on Tuesday that it is investigating “a potential issue” with its customers’ credit card data.

“We take the protection of customer information very seriously, and are working to resolve the situation,” said Mark Cautela, a Staples spokesman.

Cautela said that Staples has contacted law enforcement about a possible data breach and pledges that it will not hold customers liable for any fraudulent activity if a breach is confirmed.

Brian Krebs, a cybersecurity blogger who first broke the news of a breach at Home Depot, has reported that banks say they have noticed unusual activity that suggests that Staples locations in the “Northeastern United States are currently dealing with a data breach.”

The investigation at Staples follows a rash of breaches at other major retailers in the last year, including Target, Home Depot, Michaels and P.F. Chang’s.  Banking giant J.P. Morgan recently confirmed a cyberattack on its systems, though it did not affect sensitive customer data, such as credit card numbers or bank account information, the bank said.