The name of the ‘pussy-bow’ blouse may have raised eyebrows, but Melania Trump’s choice of fashion at Sunday’s presidential debates appears to have resonated with shoppers.

Roughly 36 hours after Trump appeared in the $1,100 pink silk blouse, it had sold out in almost every size on the luxury retail site Net-a-Porter. As of Tuesday morning, it was available only in size 38.

Trump’s appearance came just days after the release of a 2005 video in which her husband, Republican presidential candidate Donald J. Trump, brags about kissing and groping women.

“And when you’re a star, they let you do it,” Trump says in the video obtained by The Washington Post. “You can do anything. Grab them by the p—y. You can do anything.”

Two days after the video’s release, Melania Trump appeared beside her husband in the pussy-bow blouse, a style of top with a bow at the neck.

Melanie Trump’s choice of attire was unintentional, a spokesperson for the Trump campaign told Sopan Deb of  CBS News.

Intentional or not, it appears Americans like what they saw.

Google data shows an uptick in searches for “Gucci pussy-bow” following the debate. The heightened interest began at 9 p.m. on Sunday at the start of the debate and peaked at 11 p.m., shortly after the debate ended.

“I’m actually very surprised it sold out,” said Marissa Mitrovich, founder of the Washington fashion blog Politiquette. “It’s not an inexpensive item of clothing.”

The $2,190 white crepe dress Melania Trump wore to the Republican National Convention also sold out on Net-a-Porter within 24 hours of her appearance, according to Fast Company. Her spokesman told the magazine that Melania Trump does not work with a stylist and picks out her own clothing. Net-A-Porter and Gucci did not respond to The Washington Post’s requests for comment.

Does all this mean Melania Trump might become America’s next fashion icon? Not likely, says David Yermack, a professor of finance at New York University’s Stern School of Business.

“Melania Trump is very unlike to ever become first lady — and even she does, she doesn’t have the widespread appeal that Michelle Obama does,” he said. “Most likely she will disappear from public view as soon as the election is over.”

Yermack reported in a 2011 study that Michelle Obama’s fashion choices — whether $118 J. Crew cardigans or the $2,095 Narciso Rodriguez dress she wore to the State of the Union address this year — routinely sell out, boosting bottom lines for companies, as well as the overall stock market.

“Company stock prices rise significantly when the First Lady wears their clothing, increasing about 1.7 percent in the week following her most closely watched appearances,” he wrote. “During 2009 her public appearances led to immediate gains exceeding $5 billion in shareholder value for various clothiers.”

That impact is unprecedented, he said.

Even someone like Kate Middleton, who has spurred her share of spending sprees doesn’t have the market-moving impact as Michelle Obama does, according to Yermack.

“She is thin and remote and regal, while Michelle Obama is more like a middle-class mom,” he said. “The consumer identifies more with Michelle Obama.”

That issue of relatability may ultimately limit Melania Trump’s reach, whether or not she becomes America’s next First Lady, Yermack said.

“She’s not a sympathetic figure that’s likely to appeal to the middle class,” he said. “What you’re seeing in the debates is likely a one-time phenomenon.”

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