Amazon has acquired Whole Foods in a record-setting $13.7 billion deal. In its review of the deal, the FTC is looking into allegations against Amazon of tampering with comparison prices. (Amazon founder and CEO Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post). (Jhaan Elker/The Washington Post)

Attention, shoppers: Whole Foods Market is now owned by Amazon.com.

And in case you missed the “Whole Foods + Amazon” banner at the entrance, there are plenty of reminders around the store: Amazon Echoes piled high in front of the strawberries (“farm fresh!”), a poster for the voice-activated device next to the organic peaches, and a sign next to the coffee bar proclaiming, “This is just the beginning.”


Whole Foods stores now sell Amazon’s Echo and Echo Dot devices. (Joseph Pisani/AP)

The beginning, Amazon announced last week, would mostly mean lower prices on a few dozen food items. On Monday in Washington, that meant avocados were marked down 26 percent to $1.49 apiece, while New York strip steaks were discounted 18 percent to $13.99 per pound. (Jeffrey P. Bezos, the founder and chief executive of Amazon, owns The Washington Post.)

“Everybody should be able to eat Whole Foods Market quality,” Jeff Wilke, chief executive of Amazon Worldwide Consumer, said last week after regulators approved the $13.7 billion takeover. “We will lower prices without compromising Whole Foods Market’s long-held commitment to the highest standards.”

But not all shoppers were impressed.


Discounted products throughout the store were marked with “Whole Foods + Amazon” signs. (Joseph Pisani/AP)

“No difference,” Roberto Martinez, 34, said as he ate breakfast outside the Logan Circle store. “I paid $13 for this oatmeal — how can anyone say that’s not expensive?”

At the next table, Dragan Jakovljev was eating eggs and sausage. He shops at Whole Foods several times a week, but today things looked a bit different. “You can see signs that Amazon is taking over,” he said of the Echo display. “I’m not low-tech or anything, but that was definitely a little strange.”

The Post visited a local Whole Foods store on Friday, and again on Monday morning, to compare prices. The discounts ranged from about 6 percent on the rotisserie half-chicken to about 33 percent on organic apples.

 Item  Pre-Amazon  Post-Amazon Discount
Whole Trade bananas (per pound) $0.59 $0.49 -17%
Atlantic salmon fillets (per pound) $12.99 $9.99 -23%
Tilapia fillets (per pound) $9.99 $7.99 -20%
Extra-large brown eggs $3.49 $3.19 -9%
Organic extra-large brown eggs $4.69 $4.19 -11%
85% lean ground beef (per pound) $5.49 $4.99 -9%
Haas avocados $2.00 $1.49 -26%
Baby kale $3.99 $3.49 -13%
Organic Gala apples $2.99 $1.99 -33%
Organic Fuji apples $2.99 $1.99 -33%
Organic rotisserie chicken $12.99 $9.99 -23%
Organic rotisserie half chicken $7.29 $5.99 -18%
Rotisserie chicken $8.99 $7.99 -11%
Half rotisserie chicken $5.29 $4.99 -6%
Almond butter $7.99 $6.99 -13%
Organic butter (16 oz) $4.99 $4.49 -10%
Walnut halves and pieces (16 oz) $8.99 $6.99 -22%
New York strip steak (per pound) $16.99 $13.99 -18%
Canned organic coconut milk $2.49 $1.99 -20%
Organic vodka pasta sauce $2.99 $2.79 -7%

The lower prices, analysts said, were just one part of Amazon’s effort to expand its reach.

“All the signs in the store are saying, ‘Look what Amazon’s doing for you,'” said Stephen Beck, who owns a management consulting firm in New York. “This isn’t about groceries anymore. It’s about pulling people into the Amazon ecosystem.”

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