Temperature Map

Temperatures: Latest D.C. area temperature map. See interactive map on our Weather Wall.

That was one delightful Monday. Yeah, highs within a few degrees of 70 were considerably above normal for the date, but I doubt too many people are complaining. Tomorrow may be another story, as near 80 could be too warm for this time of year? If so: fear not, cooler air is around the corner.

Through Tonight: There’s not much going on weather wise this evening. Perhaps a game of spot the cloud? Good news for evening sky-gazers! Mainly high clouds may increase over time, but probably nothing more than partly cloudy at peak. Lows range from the mid-40s in the coolest spots to the low 50s downtown. Winds are from the southwest at up to 5 mph.

Tomorrow (Tuesday): Near 80 on October 28? It’s possible, at least in a few spots. Just a period or three of scattered clouds dot the sky as southwest and west winds blow around 5-10 mph. A cold front to our west holds off long enough to really pump up that warmth. A range from mid-70s to near 80 seems most likely across the area, but enough “downslope” warming off the mountains could get some spots into the low 80s.

See Jason Samenow’s forecast through the weekend. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter . For related traffic news, check out Dr. Gridlock.


Marine Corps Marathon in D.C. on Sunday. (Joe Flood via Flickr)

Pollen: Mold spores are low/moderate. All other pollen types are low.


Tropical Storm Hanna makes landfall near the Nicaragua/Honduras border this afternoon. (NOAA)

Tropical Storm Hanna: This one ends up named about as short of time as possible when it comes to tropical systems. But, despite its meager winds, slow movement will allow for heavy rains in the region impacted, as well as the risk of flooding.

Hanna was named a tropical storm late this morning, shortly before coming ashore on the Yucatan Peninsula early this afternoon, near the Nicaragua and Honduras border. Its maximum sustained winds were 40 mph at landfall. As noted, the main risk from Hanna is heavy rain. A snippet from NHC highlights that threat:

RAINFALL…HANNA IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 10 TO 12 INCHES…WITH MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 15 INCHES…ACROSS HONDURAS AND NORTHERN NICARAGUA. THESE RAINFALL AMOUNTS WILL PRODUCE LIFE-THREATENING FLASH FLOODS AND MUD SLIDES.