Capital Weather Gang asked its followers to send in their best haiku to describe the Washington area as it experiences the most consecutive days with rain in its recorded history. (Ashleigh Joplin/The Washington Post)

The record streak of 15 consecutive days with rain ended Thursday in Washington. But the same inclement weather pattern responsible for the streak isn’t yet ready to leave town.

It’s not as if we broke the streak with a glorious warm, sunny day on Thursday. The streak ended on an overcast day, with mist in the air at times that wasn’t quite enough to count as rainfall.

Remarkably, overcast conditions have ruled D.C.’s skies during the noon hour 91 percent of the time this month. And such was the case Thursday.

But if it didn’t rain, it didn’t rain. So, not only did D.C.’s record streak of days with measurable rain end but also the streak of days with at least a trace of rain.  This latter streak actually fell two days shy of the record for most days in a row with at least a trace, 17, set March 31 to April 16 in 1935.


It’s over.

While the streak ended in D.C. on Thursday, Dulles International Airport managed to record a trace of rain (but nothing measurable), keeping its record streak with at least a trace alive at 17 days. (Its previous longest streaks were 13 days — May 5 to 17 in 1989 and June 13 to 25 in 1972.)

With rain likely today and Saturday, Dulles’s streak with at least a trace should extend to 19 days.

But then much of the region should catch a break from the rain Sunday and Monday, putting an end to all streaks. Although it will be sunny for much of Sunday and Monday, temperatures will be much cooler than normal.

Unfortunately, a turbulent weather pattern may move back into the region next Tuesday and persist for at least a couple of days. The pattern has all the hallmarks of what we’ve experienced the past two to three weeks: a storm track running straight through the area and a stalled frontal boundary creating frequent opportunities for showers.


GFS model simulates jet stream and storm track passing over D.C. during the middle of next week. (TropicalTidBits.com)

Shall we start another streak?

I jest. While we may have some more murky days next week, this pattern will break. The average position of the storm track (jet stream) does shift north at this time of year and eventually we’ll snap out of it. But as soon as we do, it’s likely to turn abruptly more summer-like.

When might this happen? I’m eyeing the period around May 23 to 25.