Under cloudy skies, visitors walk through the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial at the base of the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday. Hot temperatures and a potential for thunderstorms are settling over the region through the end of the week. (Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post)

Heat advisory noon to 8 p.m. for air temperatures in the mid-to-upper 90s and heat index values up to 105 degrees *

TODAY’S DAILY DIGIT
A somewhat subjective rating of the day’s weather, on a scale of 0 to 10.

2/10: Heat that makes you say ouch, turns you into a grouch; best to just go slouch on a couch.

EXPRESS FORECAST

Today: Hot and humid, isolated p.m. storms. Highs: 94-100
Tonight: Muggy with a few storms possible. Lows: 72-78
Tomorrow: Steamy, storms likely in afternoon. Highs: 91-95

View the current weather conditions at The Washington Post headquarters.

From your brain to your skin pores, this is what goes into your body keeping you cool when the heat turns up. (Claritza Jimenez/The Washington Post)

FORECAST IN DETAIL

Hopefully today is the worst that summer throws at us this year. Records (see summary) are definitely in play and only some well-timed clouds may save us from reaching them. Storms remain isolated today and tonight but some stronger ones are possible Friday so be on the lookout. After that, the weekend is clear sailing with much more manageable humidity and seasonable high temperatures.

Today (Thursday): A few clouds are possible in the morning, remains of overnight Midwest storms. But, for much of the day, skies are partly sunny and that allow highs to peak in the mid-to-upper 90s with some unlucky spots potentially hitting 100. High humidity levels make it feel about 4-8 degrees hotter and light west winds provide little relief. Isolated storms with some gusty winds may pop up but most of us stay dry. Confidence: High

Tonight: Stay inside is preferable given evening readings in the 80s and even 90s downtown, a lack of wind and the risk of a few pop up storms. Overnight lows only fall into the 70s. Confidence: High

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest updates. For related traffic news, check out Dr. Gridlock. Keep reading for the forecast through the weekend…

Tomorrow (Friday): Heat and humidity are still on the agenda and only barely less painful than yesterday. The good/bad news is that storms are much more likely, mainly in the afternoon. Some could produce strong winds and hail so keep an eye on the latest updates. Rain amounts should be highly variable with most common amounts in the 0.25 to 0.50 inches range. Winds are minimal except in storms, and highs top out in the low-to-mid 90s. Confidence: Medium-High

Tomorrow night: Scattered t’storms could certainly linger into the evening but as the night progresses calmer, clearer weather moves in on light northwest winds. Lows reach the upper 60s to lower 70s in the burbs and mid-70s downtown. Confidence: Medium-High

A LOOK AHEAD

Saturday is much more manageable as comparatively cooler and drier air filters down from the north. Highs are mainly in the upper 80s but lower 90s are still possible in hotter spots as skies are mainly sunny. The evening is much nicer for venturing out with readings slipping down to the upper 70s to lower 80s fairly quickly. Lows reach the 60s in most spots but near 70 downtown. Confidence: Medium-High

Humidity remains moderate Sunday making highs in the upper 80s to near 90 not so bad and even better if you are poolside under the mainly sunny skies. Overnight lows slip to the mid-60s in cooler spots but most are back to upper 60s to lower 70s as humidity levels start to increase yet again. Confidence: Medium-High

Monday sees moderate humidity which increases t’storm chances by later in the day. The increased clouds should at least help to hold highs in the upper 80s.  Confidence: Medium


Nilson Molina, 12, of Silver Spring, gives his pooch Rocky a good work at the Wheaton Dog Park. It’s a popular spot, even on very warm days because it has lots of shade, a water hose and several community dog bowls. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)