(This post is being continuously updated as new photos come in.)

On Monday, while only a special sliver of the country, running from Oregon to South Carolina, witnessed a total solar eclipse, the entire Lower 48 states was able to witness a partial eclipse — in which the moon covered part of the sun.

A partial eclipse is not as dramatic as a total eclipse, but still is fun to watch (with certified eclipse glasses, lest you damage your eyes) — as the moon eats into the sun like PAC-MAN.

Throughout this spectacle, we collected photos to share from across the country …

Eastern U.S.

Charlottesville, Va.

Frederick, Md.

St. Louis, Missouri, multiple exposure

Lake Thunderbird State Park, Oklahoma

Washington, D.C., 2:42 p.m. eastern, peak partial eclipse

Germantown, Md.

Mt. Washington, N.H.

Ohatchee, Ala.

Fort Massac, Ill., 1:38 p.m. eastern

Waynesville, N.C.

Western U.S.

Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington, via NASA


This composite image shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Lewiston, Idaho

Los Angeles, Calif, 1:56 p.m. eastern

Weiser, Idaho, 12:51 p.m. eastern

Eastern Oregon, 12:17 p.m. eastern

Saratoga, Calif., 12:15 p.m. eastern

The first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in almost 100 years moved across the U.S. at 2,000 mph on Aug. 21. Here are some highlights. (Erin Patrick O'Connor/The Washington Post)


Link: More eclipse coverage from The Washington Post