Waves of ice could be seen on a frozen lake in Forest Lake, Minn., on Nov. 28. (Newsflare)

After completely freezing over the week before, one of Minnesota’s 10,000 lakes began to thaw. The wind picked up and created waves on the newly-melted surface which rippled across the lake, breaking up the remaining ice.

The result was this mesmerizing scene on Forest Lake, northeast of Minneapolis, captured late last month.

Ice will melt in areas that get sunlight first. The light heats the ground and melts the ice. Areas in the shade don’t get any sun, so they’re more likely to stay frozen when the air temperature is hovering just above 32 degrees.

When the disparity happens on a lake, the melted side will get choppy in the wind — as lakes do — and eventually the force of the waves (rather than the sun) will break up whatever ice is left over.