There are a lot of things in Washington that spies dread. Being summoned to testify before Congress. Sitting down for a polygraph test. Further down the misery scale is making the commute to Joint Base Bolling-Anacostia, a sprawling compound south of Washington where the Defense Intelligence Agency is based.

The agency’s former deputy director routinely avoided having to make that drive through a commuting arrangement that caught the attention of the Pentagon inspector general.

Instead of driving from his home in Vienna to Bolling — a roughly 25-mile trip — former DIA deputy director David R. Shedd on many days would park his car at a closer intelligence facility in Tysons Corner, briefly go into an office there, and then get into a Pentagon-provided vehicle for the rest of the trip.

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Shedd’s way of getting to work “could be characterized as a personal limousine service based solely on reasons of rank, position, prestige or personal convenience,” the inspector general concluded in a report that was completed in July and obtained by The Post under the Freedom of Information Act.

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Shedd, who retired in January last year, six months before the date of the inspector general report, vehemently disputed the document’s findings. In a telephone interview, he defended the arrangement as key to keeping up with the heavy demands of his job.

“The use of the vehicles was 100 percent for work, to and from another U.S. government facility,” Shedd said, adding that the arrangement had been approved by the DIA’s general counsel.

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Shedd said that throughout his five-year tenure at DIA he often needed to retrieve sensitive documents, or sign into classified computer systems, at offices he maintained at the Director of National Intelligence headquarters in Tysons Corner and at the Pentagon. The stops enabled him to get information that he could review in the car or access classified networks that were not accessible from his DIA office.

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“I thought I was doing the right thing in time management and in security management,” he said.

The Pentagon’s watchdog agency disagreed after going to substantial lengths to scrutinize Shedd’s morning and evening commutes, compiling charts of his itinerary on dozens of workdays, as well as midday departures from the DIA campus for lunch.

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The report documents 43 trips to Bolling that were “essentially” home-to-work trips at the government’s expense. That kind of car service is usually a perk reserved for agency chiefs, not their deputies.

Investigators also cited “40 trips to and from restaurants … without sufficient explanation for why those locations on those occasions were essential to accomplishing the DIA mission.” When asked about these trips, the report said, Shedd “explained the food at the DIA cafeteria was poor.”

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Shedd, who also briefly served as acting director of DIA from Aug. 2014 to Jan. 2015, said he drove his own car to DIA headquarters as much as 50 percent of the time.

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Investigators also accused Shedd of failing to use U.S.-government contracted airlines when booking overseas flights to avoid layovers on cheaper routes and in some cases to secure upgrades.

Shedd, a career CIA officer who was brought to DIA to help improve its human intelligence gathering capabilities, said he only used non-contract airlines when doing so was the only way to make appointments on time. The off-campus lunches, he said, involved private meetings with executives or officials — sessions for which the DIA cafeteria was ill-suited.

Shedd declined to say whether he had been reprimanded or sanctioned, but described the multi-month probe as the work of “an IG run amok.”

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“I feel like I’m through the looking glass,” he said. “For the life of me I cannot understand what the issue was.”

Julie Tate and Craig Whitlock contributed to this report.

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