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There’s a Kevin Durant MVP billboard in Prince George’s County

(Courtesy Rick 'Doc' Walker)
(Courtesy Rick ‘Doc’ Walker)

The beginning of Kevin Durant’s incredible MVP acceptance speech earlier this week focused on Prince George’s County.

“I come from a small county outside of Washington D.C. called P.G. County,” he said, before the weepy parts began. “And me, my mom, my brother, we moved so many different places growing up. And it felt like a box. It felt like there was no getting out. My dream was to become a rec-league coach. That’s what I wanted to do. I wanted to stay home and help the kids out and be a coach.”

Eventually, of course, the speech moved on to his Oklahoma City days, which is when he began singling out every teammate, with specific messages of thanks to both the rookies and vets, newcomers and long-time teammates. But the speech, like Durant, began with Prince George’s County.

Which is why it was so cool to see this billboard go up in Prince George’s County. A friend of ESPN 980 host Doc Walker’s sent this photo to him; Walker then gave me permission to share it. He said the billboard is on Central Avenue near Addison Road, close to the Addison Road Metro stop and Central High School. Others have already noticed it as well.

The company that sponsored the billboard — Skullcandy — put up a similar one in Oklahoma City. But the Seat Pleasant one is cooler.

Dan Steinberg writes about all things D.C. sports at the D.C. Sports Bog.
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