Terry Crews is not particularly well known for his single season spent with the Redskins. But the former linebacker and defensive end — who played in every game of the 1995 season — is still one of the most recognizable Redskins of the 90s. That’s because Crews went on to great fame as an actor, appearing in Old Spice ads, movies such as “White Chicks” and the Expendables series, and most recently, the sitcom “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.”

And you know what’s coming next. Crews recently sat down with Fox 5’s Kevin McCarthy, who asked the actor if he thinks the Redskins name should be changed.

“Yeah. I do. I do,” the former player said. “To me, it’s not like we’re talking about changing the name of Big Ben in London. You know what I mean? We’re not talking about history, here. We’re talking about maybe 80 years — 80, 90 years.

“I get it. A lot of people loved it,” Crews said. “But you know what? The fact that you could possibly not offend some people, and that would make it a better experience for everybody, I think it’s worth the change, to be honest with you. I mean, if we had a team called ‘Blackskins’ or a team called ‘Whiteskins,’ uhhh. You know what I mean? I mean, just put yourself in someone else’s position. That’s all you have to do. When you see the image, and you see that, and you say, ‘Well, if there’s a way to make it less painful for someone to watch,’ then why not do it? I have no problem with that.”

Crews, as it turns out, was one of the leading characters in a 1995 David Aldridge story about race relations in an NFL locker room. Via that story:

“It is, relatively, two teams,” said Terry Crews, 27, a reserve linebacker. “On every team I’ve been on, it’s always at this table, it’s all black, and at one table there’s all white, and when the workday’s done, black guys go one place, or party at one place, and white guys go to another. I think it’s always going to be that way, as long as there are the differences.”….

Linebacker Crews, who played in Germany this past spring for the Rhein Fire of the World League, pointed out that many black players with the Redskins now live in neighborhoods in Loudoun and Fairfax counties near Redskin Park in Ashburn, where they may be the only black person on the street, and may bond with black players in the locker room to be around people like themselves again. Other players are self-described loners, who don’t pursue any football friendships.

Tre Johnson, another player quoted heavily in Aldridge’s story, has also come out strongly against the team name.

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