Red Zebra Broadcasting announced Thursday that Tony Kornheiser will do his last show on ESPN 980 near the end of this month. The “Pardon the Interruption” co-host and former Washington Post columnist said that he will launch a podcast in September.

“I have loved every minute on the radio at WTEM,” Kornheiser said in a statement. “But I felt it was time to pursue a new and appealing challenge. I will be launching a podcast this September. I am excited that this endeavor will allow me to continue to work with so many of the people who have been a part of my radio show for over the past 20 years. But I will miss all of my friends and colleagues at WTEM.”

The 67-year-old Kornheiser began hosting “Sports Radio 570 — The Team” in 1992 when the radio show debuted; the station moved to 980 AM in 1998. In May, Kornheiser’s show moved from the 10-12 slot to 11-1 as part of a shakeup that saw Kevin Sheehan, a frequent newsman on the show, join Chris Cooley from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.

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“Tony is a pillar in the Washington, D.C., sports community and we would like to express our sincerest gratitude and thank him for his dedication,” Red Zebra chairman Terry Bateman said in a statement.

No replacement for Kornheiser’s show has been announced yet, and the other parts of 980’s new lineup, including “The Morning Blitz,” “Inside the Locker Room” and “The Sports Reporters” are set to remain in their current time slots. Meanwhile, Kornheiser’s embrace of a podcast-only format should cause some amusement for his listeners, given his infamous befuddlement by technology and his show’s rocky history with podcasts.

In 2011, ESPN 980 instituted a 24-hour delay for podcasts, citing a desire to encourage listeners to tune into the live radio broadcast. That caused fans of Kornheiser’s show, many of whom live well outside the D.C. area, to protest, including with a “Free Mr. Tony” movement; the delay was lifted last year.

Kornheiser has been hosting “PTI” with another former Post columnist, Michael Wilbon, since 2001, and it continues to get strong ratings for ESPN.

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