One year ago Tuesday, Redskins rookie safety Kyshoen Jarrett was helped off the field at AT&T Stadium after a helmet-to-helmet collision with running back Darren McFadden during Washington’s meaningless regular season finale against the Cowboys.

Jarrett, an unheralded sixth-round draft pick out of Virginia Tech who developed into a versatile contributor on defense for the Redskins during his first season, had suffered nerve damage in his neck and right shoulder. He saw a variety of specialists during the offseason, but was never cleared to return to the field and was waived by the Redskins in July.

Jarrett made appearances at Redskins Park throughout the season, but remained quiet publicly about his recovery until Tuesday, when he tweeted a deeply personal, poignant and introspective message about his faith, the healing process and how his life has changed over the past year.

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“During the split seconds of everything occurring, I remember opening my eyes, longing for God to help, & my body began to regain life,” Jarrett wrote of the moments after his injury. “What I felt was very unfamiliar, scary, & I panicked. So I attempted to move every part of my body as I regained that feeling. My right arm was the only feeling that I couldn’t feel. I knew it was there. I could visually see my hand moving but I just couldn’t feel. I began to be determined to not be taking off on a stretcher. Please understand, Only God himself gave me the strength and power to sit up, get up, & walk off the field.”

Drafted as a safety, Jarrett played multiple positions for Joe Barry’s defense in 2015 and made the most of the opportunities presented by injuries to his teammates. His own injury against the Cowboys left his football future in doubt.

“Your heart breaks for him, for the injury that happened,” defensive lineman Kedric Golston told Dan Steinberg in August. “You hope that he can get everything straightened back out so that life as he knew it will be the same, and he’ll be able to come back out here and play.”

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“I’ve prayed, I’ve cried, I’ve been angry,” Jarrett wrote Tuesday. “I’ve wanted to fight. I’ve wanted to call it quits. I’ve put my family through an emotional roller coaster. It has been just as and/or even harder on my wife. It sucked! I didn’t want to hear about God for weeks at a time. I hurt. Can’t sugar coat the electrical nerve pain running from my shoulder to the tip of my fingers that I felt all day, everyday & that NO prescription felt like it helped.”

Jarrett described what it’s like to see messages on social media from fans wondering when he’ll be healthy enough to return to the field. He suggested that his personal growth during the healing process is even more important.

“I haven’t spoken about it all year besides to those closest to me,” he wrote. “I have many comments on my social media that ask if I’m going to come back next year? Are you going to play again? I believe many have miss the point. Yes, physically healing continues to take place in whichever way it does. Many have been more concerned about the game, & the status of their favorite sports team. Sure, as a fan we all have that right. But as a person, I believe it’s the healing internally that’s most important. The heart of a person. The values they seek to help conquer each day & to improve themselves as man or woman. It’s not easy & we all aren’t perfect. Understanding if that particular person is doing well spiritually, mentally, & emotionally is 10x more important.”

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Jarrett wrote that he’s been equally guilty of putting football first, but the past year has refocused his outlook on life and reaffirmed his faith.

“After 12 years for myself, football was used as an escape in various areas,” Jarrett wrote. “I’m able to admit and understand that I was allowing football to take the place of God. A jealous God. I’m more free & happy 1 year after the injury took place due to the work he has done in my heart & in my relationships. . . . I grind everyday to live, not to play football. Prayerfully, The lord is willing to see me through. In the end, it’s his will.”

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