Will Montgomery and Kory Lichtensteiger, in front of Alfred Morris during 2013’s training camp. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)

Alfred Morris’s first few seasons with the Washington Redskins remain one of the most remarkable surprises in franchise history. A sixth-round pick out of Florida Atlantic, Morris came out of nowhere in 2012 to rush for more than 1,600 yards his rookie season, second only to Adrian Peterson that year, setting a Washington single-season mark.

He followed that up by rushing for more than 1,300 yards the next season, giving him the ninth-best two-year total of any back in NFL history, just ahead of Barry Sanders and Eddie George. The eight men ahead of him on that list were each drafted in either the first or second round, and are some of the most renowned stars in the game’s history. Three are in the Hall of Fame. Morris, meanwhile, just  plowed forward with his humble style, still driving that old Mazda that helped make him nationally famous.

The style extended beyond the Mazda. Here is former Redskins offensive lineman Will Montgomery, explaining how Washington’s line greeted the news of Morris’s Pro Bowl berth. (The peg, of course, being that Morris is expected to start for the Dallas Cowboys on Thursday night against Washington.)

“As any greedy offensive line across the league, you kind of look and you see Reggie Bush getting his guys Segways, and you hear other stories of Rolexes and things like that,” Montgomery said Wednesday on 106.7 the Fan’s “Grant and Danny” program. “So as an offensive line group, between myself and [Kory Lichtensteiger] and [Chris] Chester and [Tyler] Polumbus and Trent [Williams], we were kind of looking around like, ‘Well, I wonder if we’re getting anything in the cards.’ 

“Usually when your quarterback or your running back make the Pro Bowl, there’s a little something in it for the O-linemen,” Montgomery went on. “So we were kind of waiting to see what would happen. And we all knew Alfred was a conservative guy, a late-round draft pick. He drove the beater car and all that. So I don’t think we were expecting anything too special. Maybe a nice little dinner out or something.”

As time went by, though, the offensive linemen began to realize that Morris wasn’t actually going to get them anything. Not even Panera gift cards. So Montgomery decided to press the issue.

“I just jokingly said, ‘Hey, man, you need to at least get us some Rice Krispie treats,’ kind of as a joke,” Montgomery recalled. “And then literally the next day, as we’re about to go to an away game, in comes Alfred with a double batch of homemade Rice Krispie treats. So that was our gift for paving the way for his [excellent] season and his Pro Bowl appearance: The O-line got a nice batch of Rice Krispie treats.”

Eventually there was something else, right? Well. No.

“From Alfred, it was just the Rice Krispie treats,” Montgomery said to laughter. “He at least did acknowledge and give us a present, so we can’t knock him for just totally dissing us. He got us Rice Krispie treats. It wasn’t exactly Segways or whatever cool present is out there. You hear stories of the Cowboys O-line the last year or two getting these crazy ATV vehicles. But we got Rice Krispie treats. And they were very delicious, I might add.”

It was obviously a sweet gesture. And much less dangerous than Segways or ATV. Although good luck trying to eat just one.

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