Major League Baseball is again getting ready to let its freak flag fly and allow players to — gasp! — choose nicknames to replace their names on the backs of game jerseys.

The second consecutive “Players’ Weekend” will coincide with the climax of the Little League World Series the weekend of Aug. 24. Teams will wear special uniforms sporting those nicknames and sleeve patches with space to write in the name of a coach, teammate, parent or whomever they’re thankful for from their youth baseball days.

The Nationals’ jersey design is in. It looks like this:


Trea Turner’s “Players’ Weekend” jersey (MLBShop.com)

The nicknames are in, too:

Matt Adams: “BIG CITY”
Joaquin Benoit: “JACK”
Wilmer Difo: “EL DE”
Sean Doolittle: “DOC”
Adam Eaton: “SPANKY”
Erick Fedde: “FEDDECCINI”
Koda Glover: “BEAR”
Gio Gonzalez: “DOUBLE G”
Matt Grace: “GRACEY”
Bryce Harper: “MONDO”
Jeremy Hellickson: “HELLY”
Kelvin Herrera: “K 40″
Greg Holland: “HOLLY”
Howie Kendrick: “TRUCK”
Spencer Kieboom: “BOOMER”
Ryan Madson: “BLEST”
Justin Miller: “J. MILLZ”
Tommy Milone: “TOMASO”
Daniel Murphy: “MURPH”
Anthony Rendon: “ANT”
Mark Reynolds: “SHERIFF”
Tanner Roark: “T-RO”
Joe Ross: “JR”
Max Scherzer: “BLUE EYE”
Jhonatan Solano: “TATAN”
Sammy Solis: “BIG ANGUS”
Juan Soto: “JUANJO”
Wander Suero: “THE ANIMAL”
Stephen Strasburg: “STRAS”
Michael A. Taylor: “MIGGY”
Trea Turner: “TRIPLE TREA”
Matt Wieters: “MAUI”
Ryan Zimmerman: “ZIM”

Let’s pull one of these nicknames aside real quick: Max Scherzer as “Blue Eye.”

Scherzer was born with a genetic abnormality called heterochromia iridum, which means he has different color eyes. It’s a harmless condition that affects roughly 1 in 500 people, including Dan Aykroyd, Christopher Walken, Kate Bosworth and Jane Seymour, The Post’s Scott Allen wrote in 2015, when the Nationals signed Scherzer to a seven-year, $210 million contract.

As Jan Scherzer, Max’s mother, told the Kansas City Star in 2005:

“He was born with them. Then he was 4 months old. I looked down at my baby, and he had a blue and green eye. Very clearly. I have pictures and everything. I took him to the pediatrician shortly after that, and he said: ‘They may go back and forth. They may change again this year.’ As the year went on, the blue eye got bluer, and the green eye changed to brown.”

Given the option to wear a nickname on his jersey, he has chosen “Blue Eye.” Except, does he have a blue eye?

In this photo, taken during the all-star break, his right eye looks green, and his left is unmistakably brown.


Max Scherzer at All-Star Game practice (Jim Lo Scalzo/Shutterstock)

This is Scherzer in 2016 with his dogs. Now the right eye looks pretty blue, and the left is still brown.


Scherzer with dogs Bo and Rafi (Humane Society)

Here’s Scherzer covered in chocolate syrup during the team’s “Chocolate City” fad in 2015. Again, right eye looks blue, left eye looks brown.


(Morry Gash/Associated Press)

Here’s a shot of Scherzer from 2009 when he was a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks. His right eye is somewhere between blue and green. His left eye is clearly brown.


Scherzer with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2009 (Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

And this is a photo of Scherzer with sunglasses on. (Ha! Got you!)


(Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)

So, after that thorough investigation, does Scherzer have the right to wear the nickname “Blue Eye?”

He’s 15-5 with a 2.28 ERA. Scher he does.

More on the Nationals:

Gio Gonzalez delivers when Nationals need it most in 6-3 win over the Braves

‘It’s Jayson Werth!’: Bearded retiree makes surprise cameo in local men’s league

Mike Rizzo confronted Braves announcer for implying Juan Soto isn’t really 19

Nationals are lacing up for something new: An actual division race