Philadelphia’s transit worker strike has ended, as the transit agency and union said they have reached a tentative agreement on a contract, ending concerns that the strike could have hampered turnout for Tuesday’s Election day.

There were few immediate details on the deal.

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, officials with the union and the transit agency said they had reached a deal on the five-year contract. The transit agency said it planned to start restoring service throughout the day on Monday. Full service is expected on Tuesday, although some delays could remain.

“We sincerely regret this disruption,” SEPTA board chair Pasquale Deon said, according to the Inquirer. “This has been a long few days here.”

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The union for the Philadelphia transit system has about 4,700 workers and has been on strike for almost a week. The transit system provides about 900,000 rides a day on trolleys, buses and subways as part of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority system, known as SEPTA.

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There had been concerns about how the strike would have affected Election Day, as many who live in the area might not have another way to get to polls. SEPTA officials had said they had hoped to end the strike before Tuesday’s Election Day, noting that they did not want the walk out to “prevent any voters from getting to the polls and exercising their right to vote,” according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The two sides had disagreed over health care coverage, pay increases, pension benefits and other issues. The strike had caused serious traffic backups in the Philadelphia area’s morning and evening rush hours and a drop in attendance at the city’s high schools.

Deon, the SEPTA board chairman, said the deal is fair and gives “wage increases, pension improvements, and maintains health care coverage levels while addressing rising costs,” according to the Associated Press.

The new contract does have to be ratified by union members and approved by the SEPTA board, the Associated Press said.

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