Ryan Riess wins 2013 World Series of Poker

Ryan Riess, 23, a poker professional from East Lansing, Michigan, holds up his championship bracelet after winning the World Series of Poker $10,000 buy-in no-limit Texas Hold 'Em tournament at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada November 5, 2013. Riess takes home $8,359,531 in prize money for first place. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY) Ryan Riess, 23, a poker professional from East Lansing, Michigan, holds up his championship bracelet after winning the World Series of Poker main event. Riess takes home nearly $8.4 million in prize money for first place. (REUTERS/Steve Marcus)

Wearing Detroit Lions all-pro wide receiver Calvin Johnson’s jersey, 23-year-old professional poker player Ryan Riess won the World Series of Poker main event late Tuesday, taking home nearly $8.4 million in prize money.

Riess, a Michigan native, started from behind against 29-year-old Las Vegas club promoter Jay Farber, but took the lead two hours into the event.

On the final hand, Farber went all-in with a queen-five. Riess, dealt an ace-king, called his opponent’s bluff.

The first three cards came four-jack-10 and neither the fourth nor fifth cards made a difference on Riess’s upperhand.

Riess said he knew Farber was bluffing because he made similar gesture earlier in the night when winning a huge pot holding just a six-high.

“I was picking up on his body language and facial tells. When everybody was screaming then, he did the exact same thing,” Riess said (via Associated Press.)

Riess, who graduated from Michigan State, becomes the sixth consecutive WSOP main event winner under the age of 25, according to ESPN Stats and Info. He expressed his excitement on Twitter early Wednesday morning.

Farber, who said he plans on keeping his day job, takes home nearly $5.2 million. The duo beat out 6,352 main event participants, including seven at the final table.

Final table results: (via WSOP.com)

1st: Ryan Riess – USA – $8,361,570
2nd: Jay Farber – USA – $5,174,357
3rd: Amir Lehavot – Israel – $3,727,823
4th: Sylvain Loosli – France – $2,792,533
5th: JC Tran – USA – $2,106,893
6th: Marc-Etienne McLaughlin – $1,601,724
7th: Michiel Brummelhuis – Netherlands – $1,225,356
8th: David Benefield – USA – $944,650
9th: Mark Newhouse – USA – $733,224

Kelyn Soong is a news aide and blogger and covers high school tennis for The Washington Post sports section.

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Cindy Boren · November 6, 2013

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