Some Heisman trophies are publicly displayed behind thick glass. Others are tucked away in the winner's home. But not Johnny Lattner's trophy. The 1953 winner sends it out in the world to benefit others. The Fold's Gabe Silverman shows you how. (Nicki Demarco/The Fold/The Washington Post)

In case you missed it, Post reporter Kent Babb spent months tracking down every Heisman Trophy that’s ever been handed out. The trophies have survived floods, questionable financial decisions, trips through airport X-ray machines — and the unsure hands of tailgating fans who are both unaware of its heft (it’s 45 pounds) and perhaps have had a few adult beverages.

A reminder to future Heisman winners: Keep your trophies under lock and key.

Ernie Davis:

After Davis’s death at age 23 following a fight with leukemia, his mother donated his Heisman Trophy — historic as the first awarded to an African American — to Syracuse. Although it was stolen and then returned in 1976, assistant athletic director Sue Edson said it’s now on display at the Carrier Dome, where the Orange plays football and basketball.

Howard Cassady:

Cassady’s wife, Barbara, said the 1955 Heisman Trophy is at their home on Davis Islands, Fla., often under close watch. In the early 1980s, the trophy was stolen along with several other awards. Apparently unaware of the Heisman’s value, the burglar was melting down the gold and silver in Cassady’s other trophies, and had tossed the Heisman in a garbage can. A sanitation worker noticed a bronze arm sticking out the bin and alerted authorities, Barbara said. Despite minor damage, the trophy was returned to Cassady, and as a result, it now spends part of its time in a safe.

Read more Heisman tales here, and the list of every trophy handed out can be found here. Archie Griffin, the only person to win it twice, talks about his Heisman in a video here. And take a look at this year’s finalists here.