O.J. Simpson’s Heisman Trophy: Where is it now?

Some Heisman trophies are publicly displayed behind thick glass. Others are tucked away in the winner's home. But not Johnny Lattner's trophy. The 1953 winner sends it out in the world to benefit others. The Fold's Gabe Silverman shows you how. (Nicki Demarco/The Fold/The Washington Post)

In case you missed it, Post reporter Kent Babb spent months tracking down every Heisman Trophy that’s ever been handed out. The trophies have survived floods, questionable financial decisions, trips through airport X-ray machines — and the unsure hands of tailgating fans who are both unaware of its heft (it’s 45 pounds) and perhaps have had a few adult beverages.

The trophy won by O.J. Simpson in 1968, meanwhile, isn’t being seen by anyone. Reports Babb:

In 1999, a man named Tom Kriessman, the owner of a small steel company, bid $255,500 for O.J. Simpson’s 1968 Heisman Trophy, which was being auctioned to settle civil-suit debts following the deaths five years earlier of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. Kriessman admits now that he made the winning bid to try to impress his then-girlfriend. “It sort of snowballed,” he said. Fourteen years later, Kriessman said he has matured past such impulse and showmanship; he now keeps the Heisman in a safety deposit box at a bank in Philadelphia. It’s not only far out of view; he says many of his closest friends have no idea he owns one of the most infamous trophies in American sports history.

Read more Heisman tales here, and the list of every trophy handed out can be found here. Archie Griffin, the only person to win it twice, talks about his Heisman in a video here. And take a look at this year’s finalists here.

After spending the first 17 years of his Post career writing and editing, Matt and the printed paper had an amicable divorce in 2014. He's now blogging and editing for the Early Lead and the Post's other Web-based products.

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Lindsay Applebaum · December 10, 2013

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