Hulk Hogan in a 2012 photo. (Chris O’Meara / AP)

Hulk Hogan found that the controversy over his use of the N-word wasn’t going away Sunday night.

The legendary pro wrestler, whose accomplishments were scrubbed from the World Wrestling Entertainment Web site and whose contract was terminated after the report of a video of him using the word surfaced Friday, retweeted a comment that brought further attention to him.

[WWE washes its hands of Hulk Hogan]

Twitter user Wolfshead Online, whose bio says he is a “citizen journalist, MMO and virtual world commentator, GamerGate supporter, Roman Catholic, conservative and supporter of traditional values,” tweeted to his 604 followers: “Bi-racial President Obama uses N word, is applauded and keep his job. @HulkHogan uses N word, is vilified and loses his job.”

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Hogan and Obama did each use the word, but in far different contexts.

[The N-word: An interactive look at a singular word]

According to a joint investigation by the National Enquirer and Radar Online, Hogan’s comments were captured on a sex tape that’s at the center of Hogan’s $100 million invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against Gawker Media:

The star of the WWE — whose real name is Terry Bollea — directed his vulgar and prejudiced hatred at his daughter Brooke, who he accused of sleeping with a black man.

Using language so hate-filled and vile it would shock even his most ardent fans, Hulk brazenly blustered to Heather Clem — the wife of his former pal Bubba “The Love Sponge,” with whom he was covertly filmed having sex with in 2012 — that he was an unabashed “racist.”

“I guess we’re all a little racist,” he crowed on the tape, multiple sources have confirmed exclusively to Radar and The ENQUIRER.

Hogan went on to drop profanity-filled complaints about blacks that you can read by clicking on the link above.

As for the president, Obama used the word in a candid discussion about race while talking with Marc Maron for his “WTF” podcast. “Racism, we are not cured of it. And it’s not just a matter of it not being polite to say [the N word] in public,” Obama said. “That’s not the measure of whether racism still exists or not. It’s not just a matter of overt discrimination. Societies don’t overnight completely erase everything that happened 200 to 300 years prior.”

Hogan issued an apology in a statement to People.com on Friday, saying,

“Eight years ago I used offensive language during a conversation. It was unacceptable for me to have used that offensive language; there is no excuse for it; and I apologize for having done it,” Hogan said in a statement exclusively to PEOPLE. The transcript featuring that conversation was published online by the National Enquirer.

“This is not who I am. I believe very strongly that every person in the world is important and should not be treated differently based on race, gender, orientation, religious beliefs or otherwise. I am disappointed with myself that I used language that is offensive and inconsistent with my own beliefs.”

Early Monday morning, Hogan was tweeting about his retweet of Wolfshead Online: