Sawan Serasinghe, right, and Matthew Chau of Australia burning calories during the men’s badminton doubles group play. (David Ramos/Getty Images)

It’s no secret that Olympic athletes enjoy indulging in McDonald’s.

Gold medalist sprinter (and newly minted Internet meme) Usain Bolt reportedly ate 100 McNuggets a day at the Beijing Olympics on his way to three gold medals. And with limited options in Rio this year, athletes have been flocking to the fast-food chain so often that the restaurant decided this week to limit to 20 the number of items that one person can order, The Post’s Joshua Partlow reported.

Even with those standards in place, Australian badminton player Sawan Serasinghe may have raised the bar for McDonald’s consumption with a meal that would likely even impress “Super Size Me” director Morgan Spurlock.

Wow what a week it has been in Rio! Have to say I am disappointed about the match today. We definitely had a good chance...

Posted by Sawan Serasinghe on Saturday, August 13, 2016

The 22-year-old Serasinghe and partner Matthew Chau failed to advance out of group play, but after training all year for Rio, Serasinghe decided it was time to treat himself with an epic post-Olympics meal.

“Now it’s time to eat some junk food after months of eating clean,” he wrote Saturday on his Facebook page.

“Some junk food” to Serasinghe apparently means: one Big Mac, one quarter-pounder, two McChicken sandwiches, two hamburgers, six orders of large fries, 40 chicken nuggets, six brownies and a smoothie. There’s also a bottle of water in the photo, probably to help wash everything down.

(While we’re here, thanks to friend and colleague Sarah Larimer for helping me figure out what each item was on Serasinghe’s table.)

By my calculation, that equals 9,270 calories, 476 grams of fat, 11,440 milligrams of sodium and 252 grams of sugar. Serasinghe, who is listed at 174 pounds, would burn 306 calories per hour playing badminton, according to MyFitnessPal.

But like Bolt and other Olympians have proved, if you work hard, you can eat hard as well. Or in Serasinghe’s case, work hard, eat harder.

(H/T Boston.com)