Andy Murray has been a vocal advocate for the women’s game for more than two years. (Joe Toth/EPA/AELTC)

World No. 1 Andy Murray, whom the Guardian recently dubbed “the feminist that tennis needs,” continued to live up to his female-friendly reputation on Wednesday after crashing out of Wimbledon with a loss to American underdog Sam Querrey, 3-6, 6-4, 6-7 (7-4), 6-1, 6-1.

While fielding questions from reporters after the match, one question stood out to him, causing him to interject with a correction midway through.

Even Murray’s mom appreciated her son’s astuteness on the matter.

Taken within the context of just the ATP, the reporter’s question isn’t offensive. Andy Roddick was the last American male to make it to the semifinals of a major. In 2009, he advanced to the semifinals of the Australian Open and the final of Wimbledon. He lost both matches to Roger Federer.

But taking the reporter’s question in the context of the entire tennis world, Murray was right to interject. American female players have dominated major semifinals for years, largely thanks to Serena Williams, who has advanced to a major semifinal or beyond 20 times since 2009.

Williams’s sister Venus, meanwhile, has accumulated the second-most semifinal-or-better advancements with five since 2009.

Then there’s Sloane Stephens, Madison Keys and Coco Vandeweghe, all of whom have made recent Grand Slam semifinals appearances.

In total, American women made the advanced rounds of a major 28 times since 2009. (See the full list below.)

Murray sticking up for his female counterparts is nothing new. In fact, he does stuff like that all the time. Before correcting Wednesday’s reporter, he called on Wimbledon organizers to give equal billing to women’s matches on the tournament’s marquee courts. According to the Guardian, Wimbledon hosts three matches throughout the day on Centre Court and Court No. 1, but two of the three matches are played by men.

“I think ideally you would have two men’s and two women’s on Centre,” he said, noting the way to accommodate this common sense equality would be by “potentially starting the matches a bit earlier.”

Murray’s also advocated for equal pay for women. While Grand Slam tournaments divvy out prize money equally, the same cannot be said for smaller tournaments. According to the New York Times, the Western & Southern Open in Mason, Ohio, paid Federer $731,000 when he won in 2015. Serena Williams, meanwhile, who took home the top prize on the women’s side made just $495,000.

That kind of discrepancy doesn’t get a lot of men’s players up in arms, but for Murray, it’s unacceptable.

“I think there should be equal pay, 100 percent, at all combined events,” he said (via the Independent) last year, while criticizing his rival Novak Djokovic, who tried to justify the pay discrepancy by comparing the popularity of men’s with women’s tennis. He later apologized.

“Crowds are coming to watch the women, as well. The thing doesn’t stack up. It changes depending on the matches,” Murray added. “Men’s tennis has been lucky over the last nine or 10 years with the players they’ve had. That’s great, but the whole of tennis should capitalize on it, not just the men’s game.”

Murray has said one of the reasons he’s become a vocal advocate for women in his sport is because of his former coach Amelie Mauresmo, who worked with Murray from 2014 to 2016.

“Right from the word go, I knew that working alongside Amelie would set tongues wagging,” Murray wrote in the French newspaper L’Equipe (via BuzzFeed) in 2015. “The reason for this is that very few players before me have worked with a female coach.

“I realized it would create a feeling of suspicion, mistrust and perhaps even negativity,” he added. “I didn’t realize, however, that Amelie would find herself up against such criticism and prejudice. … It wasn’t right.”

It was then that Murray made a self-discovery.

“Have I become a feminist? Well, if being a feminist is about fighting so that a woman is treated like a man then, yes, I suppose I have,” he said.

AMERICAN FEMALE PLAYERS TO ADVANCE TO A GRAND SLAM SEMIFINALS OR BETTER SINCE 2009

Serena Williams

2009:

  • Won Australian Open
  • Won Wimbledon
  • Advanced to semifinals at U.S. Open but lost to Kim Clijsters

2010:

  • Won Australian Open
  • Won Wimbledon

2011:

  • Advanced to U.S. Open final but lost to Samantha Stosur

2012:

  • Won Wimbledon
  • Won U.S. Open

2013:

  • Won French Open
  • Won U.S. Open

2014:

  • Won U.S. Open

2015:

  • Won Australian Open
  • Won French Open
  • Won Wimbledon
  • Advanced to semifinals of U.S. Open but lost to Roberta Vinci

2016:

  • Advanced to Australian Open final but lost to Angelique Kerber
  • Advanced to French Open final but lost to Garbine Muguruza
  • Won Wimbledon
  • Advanced to U.S. Open semifinals, but lost to Karolina Pliskova

2017:

  • Won Australian Open (while pregnant!)

Venus Williams

2009:

  • Advanced to Wimbledon final but lost to sister Serena

2010:

  • Advanced to U.S. Open semifinals but lost to Kim Clijsters

2016:

  • Advanced to Wimbledon semifinals but lost to Angelique Kerber

2017:

  • Advanced to Australian Open final but lost to sister Serena
  • Advanced to Wimbledon semifinals on Thursday against Johanna Konta

Sloane Stephens

2013:

  • Advanced to Australian Open semifinals but lost to Victoria Azarenka

Madison Keys

2015:

  • Advanced to Australian Open semifinals but lost to Serena Williams

Coco Vandeweghe

2017:

  • Advanced to Australian Open semifinals but lost to Venus Williams