Braxton Beverly originally committed to play basketball at Ohio State, and in May he started taking summer classes in Columbus ahead of his freshman season. It’s a totally normal thing for a college basketball player to do.

But then Thad Matta resigned on June 5, and Beverly requested and received a release from his commitment from new Coach Chris Holtmann. The 6-foot shooting guard then signed with North Carolina State, which had hired his coach at Hargrave Academy in Virginia as an assistant to first-year Wolfpack Head Coach Kevin Keatts. Everything seemed to be in order … except for the pesky fact that Beverly had already started classes at Ohio State, which in the NCAA’s eyes kicks into effect its rules about player transfers. On Friday, it ruled that Beverly will have to sit out this season before he can start playing for the Wolfpack.

The ruling in essence punishes Beverly for going to class. It was announced on the same day the NCAA revealed it would not be punishing the University of North Carolina, N.C. State’s chief rival, for letting its student-athletes take fake classes. I wonder if anyone in Raleigh noticed that?

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Anyway, N.C. State says it will appeal the ruling, which was handed down over the objection of Matta, who sent a letter to the NCAA on Beverly’s behalf, according to the News & Observer’s Joe Giglio.

“I’m devastated by this decision, it’s incredibly unfair,” Beverly said in a school-issued statement. “I appreciate N.C. State and the work being done here to appeal this decision. My hope is that it gets resolved and I can be eligible to play this season.”

The NCAA’s ruling on Beverly is even more puzzling when you dig into its transfer rules, which at first glance appear contradictory. While one rule states that a player is considered a transfer if he or she “attended a class or classes in any quarter or semester in which the student was enrolled in a minimum full-time program of studies,” another rule — 14.5.3.1 — says a student-athlete isn’t considered a transfer if he or she “has been enrolled in or attended classes only in a summer school,” which would seem to be the case here. Maybe the NCAA doesn’t consider Ohio State’s post-commencement classes to be “a summer school” but rather “regular school that is held in the summer”? If so, that’s peak NCAA silliness.

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Beverly will have four years of eligibility remaining at N.C. State, whenever he starts to play.

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