Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies on Capitol Hill in May. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who on Thursday praised President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate change accord, declined to comment Friday on the extent to which human activity has driven climate change over the last half-century.

She instead reiterated her praise for Trump’s decision during a visit to a D.C. charter school, saying that he had “made good on a promise to ensure that the American people are not subject to overreach” and “fulfilled a commitment to keep America first and to focus on American jobs.”

Pressed by reporters for her personal views on climate change, DeVos said: “Certainly, the climate changes. Yes.”

DeVos said she didn’t have an answer to a question about what the United States should do to confront the challenges of climate change. “I’m here to talk about students and schools today, and I would hope that we could focus on the opportunity that these kids have in this unique environment and this unique school with amazing teachers and administrators,” she said.

Eagle Academy Public Charter School enrolls about 700 students in preschool through third grade, about 20 percent of whom have identified disabilities.

DeVos — who this week unveiled a revamped website on special-education law — toured a special education classroom and a sensory room where students receive occupational therapy, and she read Dr. Seuss’s classic “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” to a group of students in the library. She also toured the school’s science fair.

Former president Barack Obama on June 1 said President Trump's administration "joins a small handful of nations that reject the future" by withdrawing from the Paris climate deal. (Bastien Inzaurralde/The Washington Post)

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