The Washington Post

Postal Service issues Rosa Parks stamp

The U.S. Postal Service issued a Rosa Parks “forever stamp” Monday, honoring the civil rights activist on what would have been her 100th birthday.

The postal service unveiled the stamp during a National Day of Courage celebration at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich.

Parks, an African American, became a prominent figure in the civil rights movement when she refused to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Ala., bus.

Parks’s defiance led to a boycott of the city bus system and helped springboard the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. into the national spotlight.

Deputy Postmaster General Ronald A. Stroman described Parks as “the epitome of courage.” He served as a young lawyer on the staff of Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) when Parks worked at Conyers’s Detroit office, according to the Associated Press.

“[Parks’s] quiet strength helped to change a nation,” Stroman said. “Let this stamp be a symbol of her courage and determination. And let it remind us to never forget the indignities of days gone by — and to never stop fighting for the aspirations of generations yet unborn.”

The Parks stamp marks the second in a new civil rights collection from the postal service.

USPS issued its first civil rights stamp Jan. 1, unveiling the Emancipation Proclamation forever stamp at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The series wraps up in August with the dedication of a stamp recognizing the 50th anniversary of the “March on Washington,” during which activists called for greater civil and economic rights for African Americans.

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Josh Hicks covers Maryland politics and government. He previously anchored the Post’s Federal Eye blog, focusing on federal accountability and workforce issues.



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Josh Hicks · February 4, 2013

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