The Washington Post

National Weather Service and NOAA propose furloughs

James Franklin, Branch Chief of Hurricane Forecast Operations in Miami. (Alan Diaz/AP). James Franklin, Branch Chief of Hurricane Forecast Operations in Miami. (Alan Diaz/AP).

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Monday proposed furloughing employees for four days across the agency, including with the National Weather Service.

The unpaid leave would help NOAA absorb its share of the government-wide spending cuts that took effect on March 1.

The agency said on Monday that it would give labor unions the opportunity to pitch alternatives to furloughs before finalizing its plan for reducing costs as part of the so-called sequester.

The union that represents National Weather Service employees criticized the furlough plan on Monday, saying it is “unnecessary and places the public at greater risk.”

For more details about this development, read the story from The Washington Post’s Capital Weather Gang.

For more federal news, visit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page and Post Politics.

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Josh Hicks covers Maryland politics and government. He previously anchored the Post’s Federal Eye blog, focusing on federal accountability and workforce issues.

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