Jane Turner loved being a FBI agent.


In this file photo dated June 17, 2013, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) seal is seen on the lectern following a news conference at the Newseum in Washington, D,C. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

It had been her dream job since she was 13, and she had been a good agent during her 25 years with the bureau.

But once she became a whistleblower, the FBI turned on her the way a mob turns on a snitch, by her telling. She wasn’t killed, but her career was.

Turner has become a prime example of the way the FBI should not treat whistleblowers. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) cites her case in a report that will be the focus of a Senate hearing Wednesday.

Compared with other feds, FBI whistleblowers have less protection against retaliation by management, the GAO says, and current procedures could discourage whistleblowing.

“Anytime a whistleblower is punished for pointing out waste or misconduct, it sends the signal to other employees that doing the right thing will be met with potentially harsh repercussions,” Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Judiciary Committee, told Federal Diary. “Unfortunately, many who come to me express fear of reprisal for raising the alarm and are even unclear of their rights as whistleblowers. In fact, one potential witness for Wednesday’s hearing backed out for fear of retaliation.”

Read more in the Federal Diary.