The next week and a half is an important part of the Jewish calendar: Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, begins Sunday at sunset. Yom Kippur, a day of fasting and contemplation, begins at sunset Sept. 22.

[How to make your challah lovelier and sweeter for the Jewish New Year]

Many families have made a tradition of gathering for meals on these holidays. If you’re looking to incorporate some fresh ideas into your spread, here are some possibilities from our Recipe Finder:


Date, Walnut, Silan and Sesame Challah. (Shulie Madnick/foodwanderings.com)

Date, Walnut, Silan and Sesame Challah: The round, braided challahs of the Jewish High Holidays are special, and filling the strands of those braids makes them even more so.


Pomegranate and Herb Salad. (Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; tableware from Crate and Barrel)

Pomegranate and Herb Salad: This salad is pretty enough for the Rosh Hashanah table, but you can enjoy it for as long as pomegranates are in season.


Quinoa With Dried Fruit and Honey-Lime Dressing. (Marge Ely for The Washington Post; tableware from Crate and Barrel)

Quinoa With Dried Fruit and Honey-Lime Dressing: Feel free to change the amounts of the salad ingredients or to add other dried fruits as you wish.


Roasted Vegetables for Rosh Hashanah. (Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; tableware from Crate and Barrel)

Roasted Vegetables for Rosh Hashanah: Full of the colors and flavors of fall.


Mushroom-Leek Noodle Kugel. (Julia Ewan/The Washington Post)

Mushroom-Leek Noodle Kugel: There’s none of the traditional sweet or spice in this kugel, but the sauteed mushrooms and tender leeks meld with the noodles into a delicate dish.


Holiday Brisket. (Courtesy Four Seasons Hotel)

Holiday Brisket: The brisket can be cooked a day or two in advance, during which its flavor will improve.


Spiced and Fruit-Stuffed Chicken Breasts. (Julia Ewan/The Washington Post)

Spiced and Fruit-Stuffed Chicken Breasts: The chicken breasts can be stuffed up to 2 days in advance, wrapped well and refrigerated.


Sephardic Leeks With Tomato. (Marge Ely for The Washington Post)

Sephardic Leeks With Tomato: Leeks are one of the seven symbolic foods blessed and served at a Sephardic Rosh Hashanah seder.


Honey-Caramel Apple Wedges. (Julia Ewan/The Washington Post)

Honey-Caramel Apple Wedges: Eating apples and honey for Rosh Hashanah is said to ensure a sweet new year.


Apple-Carrot Tatin Cake. (Jonathan Ernst for The Washington Post)

Apple-Carrot Tatin Cake: This dessert is made with apples, honey and carrots, but no dairy products, which makes it suitable for a Rosh Hashanah dinner.


Homemad bagels. (Dayna Smith for The Washington Post)

Homemade Bagels: Lots of fun to make and perfect to break your Yom Kippur fast, especially with Confetti Vegetable Smish or Smoked Salmon Smish.

Related items:

How to make your challah lovelier and sweeter for the Jewish New Year

Rosh Hashanah lunch, warm even at room temperature

Apple-honey pairings for the Jewish New Year and beyond

Kreplach, a hole-y alternative to break-fast bagels for Yom Kippur