Clockwise, from top left, Brown Butter Sorghum Caramels, Rose Petal Harissa, Fruit and Nut Truffles and Mango Coconut Macadamia Conserve are just a few of the homemade gifts we would like to give this year. (Photos by Dixie D. Vereen, Deb Lindsey and Scott Suchman for The Washington Post)

If you’re gifting an edible item this holiday season, why not make it homemade? It’ll be that much more special, plus you can usually customize your creation to make it even more unique. Here are a few of our top ideas, fit for nearly anyone on your list.

Be sure to include best-by dates with your gift (especially for the more perishable items!); a little note or card with suggested uses is a nice touch, too.

Jump to: Baking mixesDairy-free cheese and butterCondiments and spice blendsSweetsPreserves

Baking mixes

With this batch of baking mixes, be sure to include copies of the accompanying recipes and mix-in suggestions for the recipient.


(Goran Kosanovic for The Washington Post)

Big Batch Cornmeal Dry Mix. Make it into sweet or savory corn bread, muffins or pancakes.


(Goran Kosanovic for The Washington Post)

Big Batch Dry Mix. A plain mix (with spelt or whole-wheat flour for substance) that can make muffins, cakes, scones and more.


(Goran Kosanovic for The Washington Post)

Big Batch Chocolate Dry Mix. Ideal for chocolate layer cakes, but also muffins, scones or cupcakes.

Dairy-free cheese and butter


(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

Vegan Shaved Parm. Brazil nuts add fattiness, while miso and nutritional yeast provides plenty of umami. It’s nice on pasta or melted over garlic bread.


(Goran Kosanovic for The Washington Post)

Vegan White Cheddar Cashew Cheese. It tastes remarkably similar to sharp cheddar, but is creamier and perfect for spreading on crackers or adding to mac and cheese.


(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

Cauliflower Jack Vegan Cheese. A nut-free cheese that is excellent as a spread or melted over bread.


(Scott Suchman for The Washington Post)

Nina’s Vegan Aquafaba Butter. Takes about a minute to make (!). Pack it in cute little glass jars with a box of crackers or loaf of bread.

Condiments and spice blends


(Renee Comet for The Washington Post)

Garlic Paste (Toum). Do your friends love garlic? They’ll appreciate a jar of this smooth, versatile paste. (It makes a big batch, so you could gift smaller portions to multiple people.)


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Rose Petal Harissa. Rich, spicy and addictive. (The rose flavor isn’t overwhelming, in case you’re wondering!)


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

The Hamilton’s House Mustard. A creamy mustard that’s not too spicy.


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Bay Leaf Rub. Great on fish and chicken.


(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

Plus, check out five other spice blends from Lior Lev Sercarz, chef and owner of New York spice store La Boite. (This is also a handy way to rid your cabinet of lesser used spices; it’s like regifting, but in a thoughtful way.)

Sweets


(Dixie D. Vereen for The Washington Post)

Fastest Dark Chocolate Peppermint Sauce. An easy sauce to drizzle over ice cream, pound cake or waffles.


(Dixie D. Vereen for The Washington Post)

Brown Butter Sorghum Caramels. Nutty and tender, with a flavor similar to molasses.


(Dixie D. Vereen for The Washington Post)

Maple Olive Oil Pecan Granola. Easy to customize!


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Earl Grey White Chocolate Truffles. Using a high quality white chocolate is key to these complex little bites. Feel free to use your favorite tea blend.


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Fruit and Nut Truffles. This candy is a healthful blend of almonds, dates and cinnamon, with a pretty coating of shredded coconut for extra measure.

For more sweet (and a few savory) ideas, poke through our holiday cookie generator, featuring more than 300 recipes to suit any taste.

Preserves


(Scott Suchman for The Washington Post)

Mango Coconut Macadamia Conserve. Chewy, sweet and crunchy. It’s good with yogurt for breakfast or spooned onto vanilla ice cream for dessert.


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Blood Orange Curd. You could also make this with lemon, lime or grapefruit.


(Shulie Madnick)

Quince Jam. No canning required! This keeps refrigerated for several weeks.


(Dixie D. Vereen for The Washington Post)

Cardamom Pickled Grapes. Another non-canning recipe; these make an unexpected addition to a cheese plate (which means you could probably pack them with a block of nice cheese, for extra measure.)

More from Food:

25 sweet, savory and drinkable homemade gifts

Three strategies for giving the gift of wine

Holiday cookie generator