(Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

This week’s top recipes feature foods we thought we knew in a whole new light. Potatoes get spiced, raisins get pickled and rhubarb gets a complete savory makeover. Toss in a little international drama, and you’ve got recipes that can stand up to some hearty conversation.

1. Roasted Eggplant With Fresh Mozzarella, Tomatoes, Pickled Raisins and MintMany people don’t like raisins — sorry, it’s a fact! However, pickling them adds a little tart edge and a tiny bit of plumpness to make them a multidimensional star in this dish. Partnered with creamy mozzarella, roasted eggplant alongside and some crunchy, garlicky bread crumbs, it’s a magical flavor match you never knew you needed. Get the play-by-play on Voraciously.


(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky)

2. Shaved Rhubarb and Radish Salad with Apple Cider VinaigretteWe love rhubarb in a pie, but we also like to treat it as a savory vegetable. Shaved into translucent ribbons with pink skinned radishes, rhubarb makes for a lovely salad, bright and light for spring. You’ll find more savory rhubarb recipes on Voraciously.


(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky)

3. Dosa Potatoes With Lime and KetchupPotatoes and ketchup go together like cereal and milk. Spice those potatoes like the ones you get in a dosa and watch that relationship blossom into something utterly delightful. A squeeze of lime makes the whole ensemble sing. On Voraciously, you’ll find two more ways to go for Indian-style potatoes.


(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky)

4. Mary Berry’s Orange Tea BreadBack again for another whirl in the top recipes is this fragrant and fruit-studded tea bread by none other than the queen of British bakes. The best part? You only need one bowl! Head to Voraciously for the step-by-step guide.


(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

5. Aperol SpritzThis slightly bitter, bubbly, low-alcohol drink made with Italian Aperol has made quite a stir this week when a New York Times column by a cookbook author proclaimed that the humble spritz is not a good drink. The people of social media were both mad and confused. Why attack a bright, light drink that brings so much joy when sipped on a patio in springtime? Why not just relax, sip this Italian favorite and be happy? Catch more of the drama on Voraciously.

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