For those of us who have grown accustomed to taking a deep breath and wedging ourselves into Baked & Wired's tiny Georgetown shop, the first thing you notice about Tony and Teresa Velazquez's new location in Mount Vernon Triangle is the space.

Lots and lots of beautiful space.

A Baked Joint offers lots and lots of open space for customers. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
A Baked Joint offers lots of beautiful open space for customers. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

The second thing you notice are the sandwiches, custom-made on breads that head bakers Bill Chilcott, Omar Qazi and Kyle Ferris produce daily at the new location inside the Lyric at 440K. Or perhaps the second thing you notice, if you're thirsting for such, are the drinks: the beer, wine and cocktails available to pair with your bread-based bites.

Regardless, the coffee and sweets shop maybe now needs a third descriptor in its name, something like Baked & Wired & Bent. Or Baked & Wired & Blitzed. Or Baked & Wired & Blotto. (I could go on, but I suspect you get the point.)

A Baked Joint has 90 seats, whether on stools, at communal tables or along a banquette. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
A Baked Joint has 90 seats, whether on stools, at communal tables or along a banquette. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

The owners are apparently struggling with the name as well because they still haven't settled on one. For the time being, the shop has been dubbed, simply, A Baked Joint. It's a temporary handle, says operations director Tessa Velazquez, daughter of the owners.

Even without a permanent moniker, the 90-seat space will afford customers plenty of spots to sit, eat, read, drink and contemplate a name for the shop. Should you choose to eat, the sandwiches here are a joint effort between Teresa Velazquez and Gerald Addison, former chef at Eat the Rich. Among their creations (full menu below) are a meatloaf sandwich with bourbon ketchup and crispy shallots on grilled white bread and smoked eggplant puree with roasted sweet potato, goat cheese, peppers and crispy kale on ciabatta.

The breads are the rock stars here. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The breads are the rock stars here. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

The breads, all produced at A Baked Joint for both locations, are the rock stars. They're available as loaves for takeaway or sliced and slathered for a line of gourmet toasts (including one with peanut butter and Sriracha!) or wrapped around various fillings for sandwiches. The breads vary daily but can include baguettes, sourdoughs, ciabatta, focaccia, whole wheat, country loaf and more.

The drinks menu is small, featuring only four wines by the glass (two reds, two whites), three local beers (DC Brau Pils, 3 Stars Peppercorn Saison and Atlas Rowdy Rye for now) and several cocktails with freshly squeezed fruit juices (created by Rob Tinney from CopyCat Co.). Tinney's pisco libation, mixed with watermelon juice and basil simple syrup, sounds like my kind of summer drink.

The smoked eggplant sandwich with sweet potato, goat cheese, crispy kale and peppers. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
Smoked eggplant sandwich with sweet potato, goat cheese, crispy kale and peppers. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

As long as I want it before 8 or 9 p.m., that is. Starting next week, a Baked Joint will follow the hours of Baked & Wired. Tessa Velazquez says the hours will remain fixed for a couple of months, then expand as the new place is ready for longer days.

A Baked Joint, 440 K St. NW, 202-408-6985, www.abakedjoint.com. Hours: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday; 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday; and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday.

The morning menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The morning menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The lunch and dinner menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The lunch menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The drinks menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
The drinks menu. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)