Scene from the campus of Brown University, in Providence, R.I., (Steven Senne/AP)

A Washington Post article published Monday evening examines the experience of some students in the Ivy League who come from families with high financial need.

For context, here is a look at key financial-aid measures at seven of the eight Ivy schools, drawn from their most recent answers to the Common Data Set questionnaire for the school years 2014 and 2015.

  • Brown University: Of 1,613 freshmen, 43 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $42,109. Thirty-four percent of Brown graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $22,197.
  • Cornell University: Of 3,180 freshmen, 44 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $39,787.  Forty-three percent of Cornell graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $24,394.
  • Dartmouth College: Of 1,112 freshmen, 48 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $46,917.  Forty-three percent of Dartmouth graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $19,135.
  • Harvard University: Of 1,660 freshmen, 56 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $47,053.  Twenty-six percent of Harvard graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $15,117.
  • Princeton University: Of 1,338 freshmen, 62 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $46,208.  Sixteen percent of Princeton graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $8,577.
  • University of Pennsylvania: Of 2,350 freshmen in fall 2015, 45 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $42,150.  Twenty-eight percent of graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $26,157
  • Yale University: Of 1,364 freshmen, 51 percent received need-based grants. Their average award was $50,359.  Seventeen percent of graduates took out loans to pay for college, and their average debt totaled $15,521.

Columbia University, the eighth Ivy school, declines to release its Common Data Set answers, so comparable information was not available. The university told The Post that about half of the 6,000 students in its selective college and engineering school receive financial aid. About 27 percent of freshmen took out loans in the most recent school year, the university said. About 12 percent of its undergraduates have enough financial need that the university does not expect their parents to pay anything toward the cost of college.