THEN: A picture of Michael Brown can be seen in the lobby of Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church before his funeral on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in St. Louis. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: Reflections are seen in a door at the Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis, on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

Sunday, Aug. 9 marks one year since the death of Ferguson, Mo. teenager Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by police officer Darren Wilson. The incident launched several nights of protests across Ferguson, with people from all over the country descending on the city. This weekend, hundreds of thousands are expected to return to Ferguson to engage in peaceful protests, marches and vigils that will commemorate the life of Brown.

Last year Washington Post staff photojournalist Jahi Chikwendiu spent several days and nights documenting the scenes of protest and face-offs between law enforcement and local residents. A year later, Washington Post photojouralist Jabin Botsford retraced Chikwendiu’s steps and photographs to document the many ways the community of Ferguson has changed, and, in some cases, stayed the same. Both Chikwendiu and Botsford spoke to In Sight briefly on their individual experience of photographing a city whose events have helped spur a national conversation on law enforcement across the country.


THEN: A small clump of businesses are boarded up after a couple of rounds of looting, on Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: Stores along W. Florissant Avenue are seen almost a year after the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown by white police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, MO on Saturday, August 01, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

In my coverage of the events in Ferguson after the shooting death of Michael Brown, I always reminded myself that coverage had to go beyond the theatrics of protest. The dramatic shows of protest that included chant-filled marches and cat-and-mouse games of chase between demonstrators and police couldn’t be ignored, but I worked to see and hear beyond the loudly squeaking wheels that seemed to draw much of the media’s attention. It was important for me to always ask myself about the underlying issues that led to protests and demonstrations in the first place. It was important to try to visually connect, sometimes symbolically, the daily theatrics of protest and the underlying matters that drove people to the streets. — Jahi Chikwendiu


THEN: Crowds mingle following a Ferguson City Council meeting on Monday, Nov. 10, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: The Ferguson City Administration building on July 29, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: A man makes his way past a burning police car as a line of officers prepare to clear the street of protesters on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: A spot where a police car burned is seen on South Florissant Road in Ferguson, Mo. on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

For me, documenting Ferguson one year later was interesting because I had only seen the events play out in the news. Being on the ground seeing the same places where I had seen so much confrontation take place, and how that contrasted with how the city appears now was surreal at first. I enjoyed exploring the community and trying to find all of the places where Jahi’s photos were shot. It was enlightening to look at places through another photographer’s eye because we all see so differently. And even though I was doing my best to mimic his photos, I found myself with many different challenges. One of which is my height. I am 6-foot-5, and to get many of the perspectives right I had to hunch down to about 5-foot-10 or 5-foot-11. When I stopped, put my camera down, and took the time to really listen to the people in Ferguson, they welcomed me with open arms.– Jabin Botsford


THEN: Hundreds of protesters gather, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: The Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: Buildings smolder on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: An empty lot where a building was burned is seen along W. Florissant Avenue on Friday, July 31, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: Organized by a group called TribeX, demonstrators perform a “Die In” where a police shooting of civilians is acted out, on Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014. (Jahi Chikewendiu)

NOW: A man rides his bike through construction along Delmar Blvd across from the Tivoli Theatre where a “die-in” had been staged nearly one year before, Aug. 1, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: A row of burned-out car shells at a car dealership on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: Cars at Auto Buy Credit are seen along W. Florissant Avenue, July 31, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: A’Niyah Johnson, 1, makes her way into a boarded barbershop on W. Florissant Avenue, Nov. 10, 2014. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: Braylon Lindsey, 3, runs into Prime Time Barber Shop along W. Florissant Avenue on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: Allen Robinson (left) and a man who would only identify himself as Ol’ Boi, both of St. Louis, rest between rounds of protests marches in Ferguson, Mo. ( Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: A Furniture For Less store is seen along W. Florissant Avenue on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

THEN: A trail of roses line the road as a memorial for Brown, August 2014, in St. Louis. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

NOW: Canfield Drive on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)