Bane of the Great Lakes. (David Sandford)

Lake Erie Monster. (David Sandford)

Canada-based photographer David Sandford has been making pictures for more than 18 years. During that time, he has mostly been able to pay his bills by shooting sports. But his true passion lies in making photographs about anything to do with water. Sandford explains what draws him to water: “Oceans and lakes beckon me. Since I was a kid, I’ve loved to be on, in or around water. I’m fascinated by the sheer raw power and force of it, captivated by the graceful movement of a wave and mesmerized by light dancing across it.”

With this passion for water in mind, Sandford set out at the end of November to document the violently crashing waves on Lake Erie. He keeps an eye out for the weather conditions that come together to create the incredible wave formations he captures. Those weather conditions usually coincide with 65 mph winds that send the water of Erie 25 to 35 feet into the air. And that’s when Sandford heads to the shores of Erie with his 400mm and 70-200mm lenses, sometimes shooting for six hours at a time in air as cold as -2 to 14 degrees Celsius. His dedication and passion have paid off with incredible, surreal images of the roiling waters that Sandford calls “liquid mountains.”


November Witch. (David Sandford)

Lake of the Cat. (David Sandford)

The Witch of November. (David Sandford)

Eerie Erie. (David Sandford)

Two Face. (David Sandford)

Liquid Mountain Top. (David Sandford)

The Phonograph Songs of the Deep. (David Sandford)

Red Peak. (David Sandford)

Freshwater Fury. (David Sandford)

The Gales of November. (David Sandford)

Black Friday. (David Sandford)

The Sandstorm. (David Sandford)

The Sandman. (David Sandford)

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