Shrimp fishing, Lake Hong, Hubei Province, China, 2015. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WWF-UK)

A fish farmer cuts grass to feed carp Hongxianxi Sustainable Fishery, Hubei Province, China, 2015. (Mustafah Abdulaziz / WWF-UK)

Berlin-based American photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz has been photographing the global water crisis since 2011. His investigation has taken him to nine countries, including the United States. He has traveled from Brazil to India, and many places in between, seeking out the effects of the global water crisis. His photographs show, among other things, landscapes scarred by deforestation in Brazil, poisoned marigold fields in Kanpur, India and the barren river bed of the Ganges in India. Abdulaziz’s work also includes a look at New York City’s water resources, from aerial views over Manhattan to the deep dark underground of New York’s sewer system.

Abdulaziz’s work will be on display in New York in an exhibition titled “Water Stories.” The exhibit will take place at the annual free photo festival in Brooklyn called Photoville. Sixty-eight of his images will be presented in big light boxes along New York’s East River. Coinciding with NYC Climate Week, the exhibition comes as a result of a collaboration with the HSBC Water program which is a partnership between HSBC, Earthwatch, WaterAid and WWF. The exhibit runs from Sept. 21 to Oct. 12. More information about the project can be found here.


Three Gorges Dam, Yichang, Hubei Province, China, 2015. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WWF-UK)

Children journey to collect water, Khado Muhammad Jut, Sindh, Pakistan, 2013. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/Water Aid)

Car shipping, Yichang, Hubei Province, China, (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WWF-UK)

The water pump in Osukputu, Benue, Nigeria, 2015. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WaterAid)

Aerial view of Lower Manhattan, New York, 2016. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/Earthwatch)

Bewatoo, Tharparkar, Pakistan, 2013. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WaterAid)

The Ganges riverbed, near the barrage, Kanpur, 2014. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WaterAid)

Mariam Terkuma, Orwau Nyam, Benue, Nigeria, 2015. (Mustafah Abdulaziz/WaterAid)